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24 days agoArsenal defender Sokratis: Big positive Man Utd point

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Arsenal defender Sokratis: Big positive Man Utd pointby Paul Vegas24 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal defender Sokratis was happy with their 1-1 draw at Manchester United.The Greek insists they could’ve taken all three points.He said, “It will give us a lot of confidence. We are a big team and play every game to win but some games you have to know also what you have to do better and when is your strong moment.“We had the chance to win, we didn’t win but we take a point and it gives us confidence and we go to the next game.” last_img read more

11 days agoRedknapp says West Ham midfielder Rice can fix England woes

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Redknapp says West Ham midfielder Rice can fix England woesby Paul Vegas11 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveJamie Redknapp believes West Ham midfielder Declan Rice can fix England’s defensive woes.Michael Keane’s poor form at international level continued in Friday’s loss to Czech Republic.And Redknapp thinks Rice, who operates in midfield for club and country, can do a job alongside Harry Maguire at centre-back.In his column for the Daily Mail, former Three Lions midfielder Redknapp wrote: “Is Declan Rice the answer to England’s problems in defence? I suspect he could be.”I see a centre back in the 20-year-old and that is where his future could lie for club and country, rather than being used solely in midfield.”In the modern game, players are being told to pass it out from the back, and Rice is capable of executing that.”He’d be more than happy to get on the ball and has the intelligence needed to form an effective centre back partnership.”Watch West Ham and you’ll see this young man is excellent at what he does. In the Premier League this season, only two midfielders have made more tackles than Rice.”He also ranks fourth for interceptions and seventh for ball recoveries. I believe he could apply those talents to central defence, too, while being the proficient passer Gareth Southgate wants.” last_img read more

Amid buzz Hedi Slimane unveils deja vu Celine Paris debut

first_imgPARIS – Where Hedi Slimane goes, the buzz is sure to follow.The love-him-or-hate-him designer, credited with starting the global skinny menswear style via Dior Homme and later revamping Saint Laurent, returned at long last to the Paris Fashion Week calendar to unveil his debut at Celine Friday.The reception was muted among critics who viewed it as deja vu from Slimane’s Saint Laurent days.Earlier in the day, Balmain’s ode to Parisian couture impressed insiders at almost as much as the show’s infectious soundtrack, which had model Cara Delevingne lip-synching.Here are some highlights from the Spring 2019 shows:BUZZ, BUZZ, BUZZ AS CELINE BECOMES SLIMANELady Gaga exited her limo to a flurry of paparazzi snaps.One editor was nearly run over.Catherine Deneuve pouted on the front row inside, as revelers drank from champagne labelled, of course, Céline.This was, by every indication, the biggest show of the calendar.In the giant makeshift Japanese-style building constructed for the 15-minute show at Les Invalides, an in-house staff member then whispered magic words into an earpiece: “The (LVMH-owning) Arnault family is seated and Karl (Lagerfeld) as well.”And that was that — the collection began.Soldiers in regal garb began drumming dramatically as a giant crystal opened to reveal the first look of 96.Some editors raised their eye-brows — others simply smiled — as a polka dot 80s balloon micro dress filed by.This was beginning to look like a case of fashion deja vu.Slimane, in his debut show for storied Maison Céline that was founded in 1945, has done, well, almost exactly what he did at Saint Laurent in his successful creative tenure there from 2012-2016.The sparkling 80s disco micro dresses. The waif-like models who stomped like angry teenagers. The grungy hair. The leopard or striped fur coats. The sparkle.But whatever the inspiration was, there was plenty of style to be had.Frothy shoulderless tops followed hot truncated black leather jackets.Giant round or geometric arms then appeared, cutting a fine shape in some sort of visual reference to the styles of Celine’s predecessor Phoebe Philo.If this was meant as an homage, it was short lived.These ensembles were accessorized with black veiled hats, bringing their style firmly back to the New Romantics-era that Slimane favoured at Saint Laurent.In an audacious admission of pastiche of himself and of fashion in general — square handbags shaped like vintage Chanel sported near interlocking CC’s.Chanel’s designer Lagerfeld, 85, looked on poker faced, next to Lady Gaga.In a first for Celine, Slimane used his love for androgyny to introduce men’s style to the runway.It resulted in some must-have leather shoes — thought the skinny ties on several suit looks were a little unoriginal. They weren’t the only thing.___BALMAIN CHANNELS PARIS FASHION AND MONUMENTSIn homage to the French capital’s reputation as a centre of fashion design know-how, Balmain creative director Olivier Rousteing declared his mantra was mastering “the rules before you…break them.”Guests at Balmain’s ambitious spring show, including model Alessandra Ambrosio and socialite Olivia Palermo, looked on with delight as the presentation mixed the fashion capital’s traditional couture DNA up in deconstruction.With white the dominant colour, the Balmain atelier’s needle-workers had gone to work skillfully on creating structure.A giant oval wrap that opened in segmented shell-like sections had guests snapping their cameras.The same shell-like sections were seen later, but this time deconstructed, looking almost-upside down, with a fan shape stitched onto a skirt.The look — a skintight white peaked-shoulder gown — was made with strips of material that were snipped away in places to resemble bandages — almost like the wrapping of an Egyptian mummy.The Egypt idea, in fact, was revealed as a dominant theme as the collection progressed.Rousteing explored his “fascination with the impressive obelisks, pyramids and columns that date from Napoleon’s campaigns and adorn” Paris.Dramatic Egyptian shoulders mixed with hieroglyphic prints, while denim and tweed were treated to look like ancient papyrus.Some of the detailing came across as too much, but the enthusiastic applause the designer received was well-deserved.“I enjoy pushing envelopes, thinking outside the box,” he said in a note placed on guest’s seats — in an envelope.___CARA DELEVINGNE LIP-SYNCS, DANCES BACKWARDIt’s quite a feat when a fashion show soundtrack stands out as much as the clothes.At Balmain’s Friday morning show, catchy pop hits had front-row editors tapping their feet, nodding their heads and joyfully mouthing or singing the lyrics.Model and actress Cara Delevingne should be credited for initiating the sing-along enthusiasm among normally purse-lipped fashion insiders.Delevingne opened the show in a white peaked-shoulder coat and metallic black bustier, lip-synching Prince’s “When Doves Cry” all the way down the runway.As she took a finale bow with designer Rousteing, Delevingne mouthed some lyrics again as she danced backward in heels, trying not to trip and sticking her tongue out a few times.The infectious spring collection soundtrack also included Whitney Houston’s “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” and Queen’s “We Will Rock You.”It had guests humming all the way down the gilded staircase of the venue — Paris’ opulent City Hall.___ISSEY MIYAKE’S HANDS-ON FASHION“The history of mankind has been made by hands,” Issey Miyake said in presenting a collection featuring a new flexible and malleable cloth.The Franco-Japanese house famed for its cutting-edge use of techno-fabrics this season decided to showcase a material called “DOUGH DOUGH.”The 31-piece collection began underwhelmingly with a series of gowns reminiscent of tie-dye. But then swathes of billowing fabric in celestial blue and white were used to form tops and skirts with beautifully abstract silhouettes.Models in giant hats twisted the rims of the headwear as they smiled and walked by.“Cloth too, seeks freedom,” read the program notes.One scrunched-up grey dress shown toward the end had a wonderful organic feel with veiny stripes.The cloth was a fresh fashion idea by designer Yoshiyuki Miyamae.___Thomas Adamson can be followed at Twitter.com/ThomasAdamson_Klast_img read more

Strike at Globe and Mail averted at last minute with tentative agreement

first_imgTORONTO — A strike has been averted at the Globe and Mail just hours before the deadline.Unifor, which represents 320 reporters, editors and other staff at the national newspaper, says the two sides have reached a tentative agreement.The union says details of the deal won’t be released until the agreement is presented to members for ratification.Unifor had said it was seeking pension protection and an end to what it says is a pay gap between the Globe’s male and female employees.The two sides had been negotiating for six months, but Unifor said talks had not moved forward for the past two months.Members had given their bargaining committee a 94 per cent strike mandate two weeks ago.———A subsidiary of the Globe and Mail holds an investment in The Canadian Press as part of a joint agreement with the Toronto Star and a subsidiary of Montreal’s La Presse.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Delhi Police busts gang of robbers

first_imgNew Delhi: The team of Safdarjung Enclave police station busted a gang of robbers on Monday near Arjun Nagar T-point, solving at least five pending cases in the process. A loaded country-made pistol, two live cartridges, one stolen scooty, and two stolen mobile phones were recovered from them.The team led by SHO Shivraj Singh Bisht was set up under the supervision of ACP Ishwar Singh (Safdarjung Enclave) to asses the inputs of security threats.Police were deployed at Arjun Nagar T-point to keep an eye out for the accused persons when they noticed a white scooty at about 7 pm coming from Aurobindo Marg with three people on it, all without helmets.When asked to stop their vehicle, the three sped away in the direction of Ring Road riding on the wrong side of the road. Following a motorcycle pursuit, the police apprehended all three suspects namely; Abhishek, Suraj, and Sunil.Police investigations revealed that Abhishek was the lock picker while others used to steal vehicles and used them to commit other crimes. It was also revealed that the mobile phones stolen by the gang would be sold by another of their associates named Om Prakash, who is on the police radar.South-West District DCP Devender Arya said that the meticulous planning and execution of the team has led to the successful busting of the gang.A case under sections 25/54/59 of the Arms Act and 411/34 of the IPC has been registered at the Safdarjung police station against the three apprehended.last_img read more

Indie Crossword Puzzlers Are Shaking Up A Very Square World

The New York Times3.5 The Washington Post3.9 BuzzFeed3.7 Wall Street Journal3.4 Newsday3.9 CrosSynergy3.3 The Times’ puzzle, though, isn’t the most highly rated on the Web. Indies may be ragtag, but their quality can be remarkably high. The popular blog Diary of a Crossword Fiend lets readers rate a selection of puzzles each day, from one to five stars. Indies do well, with indie icon Matt Gaffney’s topping the list and American Values Club and Quigley’s puzzles averaging above the Times so far this year. (Note, of course, that these ratings are subjective, and come from a highly selected sample of the universe of crossword solvers, namely those who rate crosswords on a crossword blog.)But that the indies are well-received doesn’t make them well-compensated. They’re wrestling with the same confusion about sustainable business models as all the other media upstarts.The New York Times has it relatively easy, with nearly 200,000 digital crossword subscribers, good for over $2 million in revenue in the first quarter of 2016, according to a company press release. When you figure in the hardcopy subscriptions and newsstand purchases due to the puzzle, plus the countless book collections, the Times crossword puzzle is almost certainly worth well north of $10 million a year. (The Times wouldn’t comment beyond what was disclosed in the press release.) Little of that money goes to the constructors: At its rate of $300 for a daily puzzle and $1,000 for a Sunday, I estimate that a little less than $150,000 a year is paid to the crossword constructors themselves.Outside the Times, though, monetization approaches vary wildly. The American Values Club crossword, the indie edited by Tausig, is subscription based. A year’s worth of puzzles is $20, or you can get a single puzzle for a buck, and proceeds are divvied up among constructors quarterly. Depending on the quarter, this model can yield more than the Times’ $300-per-puzzle rate, according to Tausig. “I’ve been a constructor for a long time, and also because I’m a hardcore Marxist, I want to put my money where my mouth is,” he said. Constructors there also retain some future rights to their puzzles. Tausig didn’t give me a precise count of his subscribers, but said there were no fewer than 3,000.Quigley, who runs an eponymous site, was inspired by Radiohead’s 2007 release of “In Rainbows” when he created his pay-what-you-want model. He publishes free puzzles on Mondays and Thursdays, and provides a “tip your constructor” PayPal link on his homepage. Between direct payments and the advertisement it provides for other paying puzzle gigs, Quigley estimated that his site is responsible for two-thirds of his income. He claimed an average of 12,000 people solve a typical puzzle on his site.And Matt Gaffney — whom other indie constructors described to me as the “juggernaut” and the “silverback gorilla” of the field and who tops the ratings list — oversees a mini-factory that publishes eight puzzles a week. About a year ago, Gaffney switched to a subscription-only model for his daily puzzle ($24 a year) which, he told me, has 500 to 600 subscribers. “It seems to be kind of the wave of the future,” he said. “But I think big media, regular media and indie puzzles will always coexist and coevolve for the foreseeable future. I don’t see one putting the other out of business.” Despite that, indies “are where all the crazy, new, fun stuff is happening.”In many ways, the crossword tumult mirrors that of the broader media world, pockmarked with hirings, firings, launches, closings and scandal. BuzzFeed hit the brakes, and USA Today ousted its crossword editor in May. But others hit the gas. The Wall Street Journal added a daily puzzle last September, and The Washington Post tapped a new crossword constructor in November. And Slate, stalwart of internet media, will feature the American Values Club crossword in its paid section, Slate Plus, starting in September.Madison, the former BuzzFeed editor, who has interned for both Shortz and Tausig, is heading back to the indie world himself. According to Madison, the BuzzFeed puzzle’s average 40,000 to 50,000 views didn’t justify its cost at the virally oriented site. (I emailed BuzzFeed for comment but have not yet received one.) He recently announced a new crossword project called Solve the Internet. Details were sketchy, but the description he gave me was heavy on “internet” and “social.” Madison wouldn’t offer a specific launch date but said to expect it soon.“I don’t understand what he’s talking about, but that’s a fantastic thing,” Quigley, 42, said of Madison’s puzzle ideas. “If we don’t go out and try to bring in that younger generation, we’ve got the buggy whip, and we’re gonna get blown out by something else.” Fireball3.9 Jonesin’ Crosswords3.3 Crossword Nation3.9 Brendan Emmett Quigley3.7 Los Angeles Times3.6 Matt Gaffney4.0 American Values Club3.6 Most highly rated crosswords Gawker wasn’t the only irreverent, iconoclastic internet media property to say farewell recently. To a much quieter dirge, the BuzzFeed crossword puzzle published its final edition this month. Its editor, 23-year-old puzzle wunderkind Caleb Madison, for whom this was his first job, left the company to strike out on his own.The BuzzFeed crossword, which launched in October, promised a millennial upheaval to the musty crossword genre: an internet-native, slang-fluent, pop-culture-obsessed puzzle aimed at young solvers. There was hope, given BuzzFeed’s large amounts of traffic, that it would serve as a meaningful competitor to the starchy, hegemonic New York Times crossword. “BuzzFeed Is Revolutionizing the Crossword Puzzle,” an Observer headline declared last year.It didn’t. Yet while BuzzFeed’s puzzle revolution fizzled, a devoted band of ragtag agitators remains devoted to the cause. A vibrant ecosystem of independent crosswords — “indies” — exists on the internet, its component puzzles multiplying and evolving, finding their niche and trying to find ways to survive. And some of them can outrate the gold standard over at the Times.“I think of the indie world like we’re all craft beer brewers,” Brendan Emmett Quigley, a professional puzzle constructor, told me. The Times is a Budweiser lager; the indies are small-batch saisons and IPAs.“My favorite thing about indie puzzles is the timeliness,” Neville Fogarty, an avid indie solver who helped found the Indie 500 crossword tournament, told me. Indie puzzles don’t have to wait months in a publication queue, as they would at the Times. They also aren’t subject to the stylistic constraints of a large media institution. Topics and themes, however recent, modern, niche or profane, are fair game. Nor are they subject to the physical constraints of a major newspaper. With few exceptions, all daily Times puzzles use 15-by-15 grids with rotational symmetry, a convention indies can and do break.Over (craft) beers recently, Ben Tausig,1It was Tausig whose tweet, about a suspiciously duplicated puzzle, eventually led to the FiveThirtyEight investigation into accusations of plagiarism against the crossword editor Timothy Parker. the editor of the acclaimed indie American Values Club crossword, reflected on the early days of indies, over a decade ago. “We were all out in the woods,” he said. “Papers were dying, papers were dropping their crosswords.” And so some crossword designers decided to go it alone. A risky proposition, but one that came with aesthetic upside. These sylvan constructors could rewrite the stylebook. “Crosswords were staid, you know? As much as I enjoyed them, there was always this feeling that the voice of the Times was not my generational voice. It was like, what if you made a crossword about rap, or something? That felt really radical at the time.”Criticism of the Times puzzle seems to have expanded of late, beyond the stylistic and into the political. It’s not just that the Times puzzle is staid, or geared toward olds. It’s been accused of tone deafness on issues of race and gender. A recent clue for the answer HAREM was “Decidedly nonfeminist women’s group,” and the clue “Exasperated comment from a feminist” led to the answer MEN. “Gangsta rap characters” were THUGS.But Will Shortz, the Times puzzle editor since 1993, is an icon for a reason. All the constructors I spoke to praised him for elevating the Times puzzle to its current station. “The Times’ job is arguably much harder, because they have to walk that thin line of making sure everyone is included,” Quigley said. It’s come a long way, too. The Times published its first crossword in 1942. If you scrape off a thick layer of dust, you’ll find a puzzle riddled with obscurities (the poets CRABBE and TASSO, the seaport HAGI, the Dutch town EDE) and ditchwater-dull clues (both IAN and YVON are clued as “Man’s name”). And even if some indie puzzlers would like to foment a revolution, it already took one to get the Times to the solid position it’s in today. Shortz oversaw a transition away from the dryest trivia to a puzzle that does include some popular culture. He has said that anything the paper covers should be fair game for the crossword.“The Times’ crossword audience is broad, from teens up to as old as people get,” Shortz told me in an email. “But the average [age] is higher than that for the indies. So in terms of overall tone and cultural references, the Times puzzle will skew a little older than the indies.” Shortz also mentioned the need for the Times puzzle to have a longer shelf life than the indies, which means it eschews some timelier subjects. The puzzle appears in syndication six weeks after its original publication, and sometimes in books years later. Boston Globe3.1 Chronicle of Higher Education3.3 Includes puzzles appearing at least ten times. Ratings are out of 5.Source: Diary of a Crossword Fiend PUZZLEAVG. USER RATING read more

Ohio State club football optimistic about future

On a windy, overcast April afternoon at Ohio State, the cleats are laced up, footballs are tossed around and a new offensive scheme is being installed. New coaches and new players provide hope for the upcoming season. This is not the beloved Buckeye varsity football team, however, but the OSU club football team getting ready to enter its fourth season this fall. OSU club football began Spring Quarter 2008. A group of about 25 players made the team and stuck it out through the inaugural season in fall 2009. The team went 1-4 the first year, beating only Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, 28-12. The second year was a similar story for the club. A team of about 35 players competed for the Buckeyes and they made improvements from 2009, but the 2010 squad finished the year with a 2-4 record. Former club president and a player for three years, Nick Herrin, said that despite the tough times the team endured those first two years, it was the most fun he’s ever had playing football. “It was just 18 to 25 guys that just absolutely loved football,” said Herrin, a fourth-year in psychology. In the first two seasons, the team was not lacking in skill or talent, but was simply outmanned when compared to their opponents, Herrin said. “The first year of the club, we had 18 guys that were as good as anybody,” Herrin said. “We were just outnumbered. We go to Xavier and Miami and they’ve got 45 guys.” Despite going 3-8 in the first two years of the club’s existence, the players said the excitement increased prior to the 2011 campaign. Through tryouts, the team was able to increase its roster size to almost 50 players last season. As Herrin said, the increase in the number of players on the team helped. The Buckeyes finished the season 6-0 and ranked No. 3 in the final Intercollegiate Club Football Federation rankings. OSU practices and plays all of its home games at the Lincoln Tower Turf Field, which is located just south of Ohio Stadium. Safety George Shapiro, a third-year in industrial engineering and club president, said looking up at the fourth-largest football stadium in the country makes him feel like “the little brother” at times. He said he doesn’t mind though. “It’s still cool that it’s behind us like that,” Shapiro said. “It’s still very exciting to play in front of the Horseshoe.” The Buckeyes held tryouts last week and added 25 players to a team with 25 players from last season’s undefeated squad. Practice began Monday and will be two days each week until the end of the quarter. The team is making an offensive transition this year, similar to that of the varsity team under coach Urban Meyer. The scheme will be more of a spread offense after last year’s team was more run-oriented, Herrin said. Quarterback Jeff Porter, a second-year in operations management and club vice president, said the biggest thing for the team this spring is to get everyone together and start teaching the new guys. “We’re just trying to teach right now,” Porter said. “We’re just trying to get the new people caught up to what the veterans have learned already so that when it comes time for the fall, we can just jump right in.” Defensive back T.J. Thompson, a second-year in finance, said learning the new schemes is key, but getting everybody excited about playing is the most important thing. “This spring, we want to get everyone just excited for the autumn,” Thompson said. “Everyone just loves playing and has fun.” Looking forward to next season, coach Ray Giesige said it’s going to be hard to duplicate what last year’s team did because of the players that are graduating. Giesige played for the club team the previous two seasons before concussions forced him to switch to a coaching role. The fourth-year in sport and leisure studies said he wanted to stay involved and help continue what he helped start. “I decided I wanted to stick around and help out because it really is a great organization and we’re trying to do good things,” Giesige said. While he said he thinks the team has lost some important players from last year’s team, Giesige is looking to build off the 2011 season and is optimistic about the 2012 Buckeyes. “We lost some key contributors, but the great thing about here is there’s so many people that we can replace them at least a little bit on the talent side,” Giesige said. “We’re looking for people to step up right now and be leaders and if that happens, I think we’ll have a pretty good year.” read more

Global stardom hasnt changed Liverpool winger Sadio Mane – Aliou Cisse

first_imgMane will be under pressure to impress for his nation as he gets their World Cup campaign is underway against Poland in Group H on Tuesday.But Senegal boss Aliou Cisse who has watched Mane scoring 20 goals for Liverpool last season and blossoming since he took part in the Olympic Games in London six years ago says his feet remain firmly on the ground.“I don’t want to say he could become one of the best players in the world, he is already one of the best, you have to stress this,” Cisse said according to Liverpoolechoes.“He plays for an iconic club in Liverpool, which is one of the best clubs in Europe. He has shown he is top notch with his club and he has something unique.Mohamed Salah, Sadio Mane, LiverpoolMo Salah laughs off Sadio Mane incident with a brilliant video Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Mohamed Salah laughed off his little spat with Liverpool team-mate Sadio Mane by posting a brilliant video showing they’ve made up.“He’s unpredictable. At any point he can make the difference with a dribble and pass so for me he is already one of the best players.“Sadio is a unique player and he can’t be compared to any other Senegal players, even if we’ve had some major ones in the past.“He’s unique and despite everything that has occurred to him in the last two or three years, he hasn’t changed. He’s just as humble as the first time I met him, six years ago at the Olympics.“His mentality hasn’t changed, his behaviour to staff and his humility to his team-mates is the same, so he’s a player who can bring a lot to the team.”last_img read more

Girdwood Hand Tram Reopened Following Fatal Accident

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36 dead as tank battle rocks Yemens Aden

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