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201516 NBA Preview The NewLook Spurs Are Gonna Be Really Good

And here’s what CARMELO thinks of San Antonio’s key players: Last season seemed like Kawhi Leonard’s coming-out party, but with Aldridge now in the mix, Leonard could see fewer double teams, which in turn could lead to even better production than CARMELO expects. The San Antonio Spurs, hoping to make another title run, loaded up on talent in the offseason. They landed coveted free agent LaMarcus Aldridge along with David West. They brought back Tim Duncan and Manu Ginobili, and signed Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green to new deals. The new players are expected to assimilate quickly with the Spurs veterans, but that’s not guaranteed, which is why coach Gregg Popovich admits that developing team chemistry is his most pressing concern. “It’s always going to be talked about throughout the league by everyone because that’s probably the biggest key of winning,” Green said. “You can have all the right pieces. But if you don’t have chemistry, you’re probably not going to be successful. So regardless of what your roster is, chemistry is the most important thing in this league, in this game. You hear it all the time. We may get tired of it. But it’s really important. We know how important it is.”FiveThirtyEight’s CARMELO projection system expects the Spurs to go 56-26 in 2015-16: Tony Parker changed up his fitness routine in an attempt to stay healthy, but Parker hasn’t played in more than 70 games in any of the last three seasons. In other words, the 33-year-old’s health may be an issue, and CARMELO clearly thinks Parker is in the twilight of his career. He needs to shoot much better than 32.3 percent from the field, which is what he produced over the summer in the EuroBasket tournament, for the Spurs to have a legitimate chance. Tim Duncan is 39, but Old Man Riverwalk will benefit tremendously from the addition of Aldridge. Duncan remains a factor on the pick-and-roll, and despite losing some athleticism, he anticipates well enough on defense to almost always be in position to help. (Also, if you were judging Duncan only by the company he keeps, check out his top four comps!) His skills are declining, but Manu Ginobili remains important to the Spurs because of his ability to run the second group on offense, which, according to some players, has shown better chemistry thus far in camp than the starters. Long jumpers and turnarounds in the post diminish LaMarcus Aldridge’s true shooting percentage, and he’ll need to make quicker decisions with the ball in San Antonio than he did in Portland. David West is one of the NBA’s most accurate mid-range shooters, but his presence in San Antonio’s locker room will be just as important as his contributions on the court. Danny Green, a premier 3-and-D wing, seems to be in the perfect situation for his game to flourish. Just don’t let him put the ball on the floor. We’re inaugurating our NBA player projection system, CARMELO, with 2015-16 season previews for every team in the league. Check out the teams we’ve already previewed here. Learn more about CARMELO here. read more

Ohio State mens basketball hits the books in preparation for No 22

OSU junior forward Marc Loving (2) attempts a shot during a game against Rutgers on Jan. 13 at the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead | Photo EditorComing off a 35-point loss to Maryland in a season that’s been marred by turbulence, Ohio State men’s basketball coach Thad Matta is taking a variety of steps to right his inexperienced team’s ship. He’s always been an avid reader, but, in an effort to find something that might help his players, Matta recently began reading a new book about psychology. Although he declined to disclose its name, Matta started sharing lessons from the text with his team hoping that something — anything — might click with his youthful Buckeyes. “The good news is I just started it and it’s, like, 250 pages,” a smiling Matta said. In its 19 games thus far, OSU narrowly lost to then-No. 10 Virginia and stunned then-fourth-ranked Kentucky at a neutral site, but the Buckeyes (12-7, 4-2) have lost three games by at least 20 points. Figuring out just what makes this team so different on a night-to-night basis is like breaking the Enigma code — it might take a computer to do it. Or a book. “Yesterday (Matta) said he’s on page 36,” freshman point guard JaQuan Lyle said. “Yesterday he read us four quotes out of the book … so who knows how many quotes we’ll get the rest of the week. One of the quotes yesterday was something like, ‘if you look at things differently, maybe the outcome will be differently.’ It was just quotes that compare to us.” Looking at their next game differently is exactly what might work for the Buckeyes. They’ve had similar games like Thursday’s against No. 22 Purdue (15-3, 4-2) before, but in each of those, the outcome has been less than desired. The three games with parallels to the forthcoming tilt with the Boilermakers — on the road against a top-flight program in Connecticut, Indiana and Maryland — all ended in 20-plus point defeats. So, looking at things differently as the Buckeyes head to West Lafayette, Indiana, might be what it takes for the team to crack the code and become the consistent basketball team it strives to be. OSU has struggled to bring the necessary energy to compete with its more talent-laden opponents when facing them on the visitor’s home floor. That, however, should not be the case Thursday, Lyle said. “I’m expecting us to come in there and play hard all 40 minutes,” Lyle said. “Start playing hard from the jump, not waiting for the second media timeout or anything like that. Just trying to play hard the entire game, I feel like we haven’t done that in a while. “We need to get back to doing that.” “With the lights on”Bouncing back from such an embarrassing loss could be difficult, but Matta said his team has been putting forth a solid showing in the gym in the days following. OSU sophomore forward Jae’Sean Tate (1) attempts a shot during a game against Rutgers on Jan. 13 at the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead | Photo Editor“We’ve had a couple of pretty good practices,” Matta said. “But we’ve practiced relatively well throughout the (season). When you step into Mackey Arena (Thursday) night, it’s on.” To be a better team when the first whistle blows, Matta said, the effort Lyle mentioned needs to be there, but it cannot be just be up to one player. Every player that sees the court needs to consistently be playing hard, the coach said, even through any mistakes the team makes. When those mistakes happen, which they are bound to, as they are just a part of the game, sophomore forward Jae’Sean Tate said, Matta always emphasizes the importance of playing through them, rather than letting them weigh players down. “Coach Matta isn’t one of those coaches who’s gonna yell at you for a bad shot,” Tate said. “He doesn’t really care about the mistakes that you make. He just wants to see you play through them. As long as you play hard, then there’s no problem. That’s just what we’ve got to do a better job of.” “It’s on”While OSU is looking at its matchup against Purdue differently, that won’t change the fact the Buckeyes will have their hands full when the game starts. The Boilermakers come into Thursday’s game on the heels of a 107-57 throttling of Rutgers on Monday. Although the Scarlet Knights aren’t exactly a heavyweight opponent, Purdue used the same balanced attack in that game that has helped it throughout the season. That balanced scoring comes from three dominant post players, in senior center A.J. Hammons, sophomore center Isaac Haas and freshman forward Caleb Swanigan. The entire trio averages double-figure scoring, with the 7-foot Hammons leading the way with 13.4 points a game. Haas, who checks in at 7-foot-2, puts up 10.9 points a contest, while Swanigan chips in 10.4 points and 8.9 rebounds. Matta said he is well aware of the three-headed monster in the paint. “They are huge,” the coach said. “We’ve got to do a great job, the best job we can, with our post defense. It’s no secret. If you look at their shot totals, they’re going to get the ball inside to those guys.”Although denying all the entry passes to the trio would be the best-case scenario for Matta’s team, that is unrealistic. Once it gets down there, though, it is on OSU’s post players, like freshman Daniel Giddens and redshirt sophomore Trevor Thompson, to step up, Matta said. “They’re going to score,” he said. “There’s no doubt about that but we’ve got to do the best job we can challenging them, taking away their favorite moves. And (we need to) rebound the basketball.” Up nextAfter the Buckeyes take on the Boilermakers, they’re set to return to Columbus and take on Penn State at 7 p.m. on Monday. read more

UNC shows OSU womens soccer whos No 1

Ohio State women’s soccer coach Lori Walker said her team battled and played well against No. 1-ranked University of North Carolina on Sunday, but not well enough as the No. 18-ranked Buckeyes lost, 3-0. UNC (4-0-0) used a first-half goal from junior midfielder Amber Brooks to open the scoring and silence a Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium crowd of 2,892. A second-half goal from sophomore forward Khelia Ohai doubled the Tar Heels’ lead and a late tap-in by senior forward Emmalie Pfankuch provided all the offense needed to upend the Buckeyes (3-2-0). “Any time the No. 1 team comes in your house and battles and your squad makes a game of it, there’s something to be proud of,” Walker said after the game. “There’s a lot we’re going to learn from this match.” The opening half-hour of play saw the Buckeyes and Tar Heels split possession, but OSU was the first to threaten to score. A Tar Heels turnover in the 11th minute sent play in the opposite direction and after collecting the ball, OSU junior forward Tiffany Cameron attempted to play freshman forward Ellyn Gruber toward UNC’s goal. Senior keeper Gay Adelaide scurried forward and kicked the ball out of play before Gruber could reach through-ball. OSU threatened again in the 31st minute when junior midfielder Aly Walker slipped behind UNC’s back line. Walker took a lofted pass and nodded a shot on goal, but Adelaide again came forward and was able to knock the headed shot aside. Adelaide would finish the match with three saves. The Tar Heels opened the scoring in the 35th minute after referee Michael Allie awarded UNC a free kick just outside the Buckeyes’ penalty area. The ensuing strike from Brooks — a low, driven shot on goal — took a deflection before glancing off the hand of Buckeyes’ senior keeper Katie Baumgardner. “I got a hand on (the shot),” Baumgardner said. “If I could take it back, I would. It was a little out of my control.” Baumgardner would go on to save two of UNC’s five on-target shots in the match. The Tar Heels took a 1-0 into halftime, but OSU took the game to UNC shortly after play resumed. In the 55th minute, Buckeyes senior forward Paige Maxwell dribbled up field, shook her defender and fired a shot from about 20 yards out that beat Adelaide, but caromed off the crossbar and out of play. “I was probably leaning back too much because I thought it was a closer shot,” Maxwell said. “I guess I leaned a little high. I should have tried to place it.” Four minutes later, UNC made the Buckeyes pay for Maxwell’s missed opportunity. Ohai collected the ball inside OSU’s penalty area, cut the ball back to create space and then calmly deposited a shot into the back of Baumgardner’s net to put the Tar Heels up 2-0. “The goal that Ohai created — if the kid can stop on a dime and keep her feet to shoot, the kid deserves a goal,” Lori Walker said of UNC’s second goal. Brooks then assisted on another UNC goal 18 minutes later. Brooks floated a cross off a set piece into the Buckeyes’ penalty area in the 77th minute. Sophomore forward Elizabeth Burchenal corralled the ball inside the six-yard box and rolled it across the face of Baumgardner’s goal to Pfankuch. Pfankuch then scored a tap-in goal to round out UNC’s offensive production in the match. “We gave up two goals on set pieces — that’s a mental thing,” Lori Walker said. “We’ve got to do better than that.” UNC denied the Buckeyes’ forwards at nearly every turn over the final 13 minutes and went on collect its first shutout of the season. After the game, Baumgardner said there were many positives to glean from the night’s result. “The kind of pressure that we played under, with (UNC) being so good and so technical, is really going to help us in the future,” Baumgardner said. Lori Walker agreed, saying she hoped for a future encounter with a No. 1-ranked team. “For us, the preparation that we get from this match will help us in the Big Ten conference,” she said. “Ultimately, you want to meet the No.1 team later on in the year.” OSU continues its regular season next Sunday at home with a 6 p.m. game against Ohio University. read more

No rest for weary Buckeyes coaches

BOSTON – There was no point in asking members of the Ohio State men’s basketball team’s coaching staff what time they thought they would finishing watching tape Friday morning – they didn’t know. You can bet it was late, though. The OSU staff has now guided the No. 2-seeded Buckeyes (30-7) to an Elite Eight appearance in the NCAA Tournament after the team’s 81-66 win against No. 6-seeded Cincinnati Thursday at TD Garden in Boston, but they aren’t done yet. Two OSU coaches said they will spare no effort in helping prepare their team for Saturday’s East Region final against top-seeded Syracuse (34-2), even if means losing a few more hours of sleep. First-year OSU video coordinator and former Duke guard Greg Paulus said he and other coaches would continue preparation for Saturday’s game in the wee hours of Friday morning where they will begin film study. “We’ll watch some film (this morning), you know, whether that’s breaking down this game (against Cincinnati) or watching some Syracuse,” Paulus said. “You just watch them and try to get familiar with them.” Paulus said he didn’t know what time the coaches would take a break for some sleep on Friday, but said they wouldn’t stop until they feel like they understand their opponent. “Whatever it takes,” Paulus said. OSU assistant coach Jeff Boals said that the short turnaround for postseason games is the main contributor to late nights put in by coaches all over the country. “With a one-day prep … you have so much film on them, and you try to prepare as good of a game plan in a 48 hour timespan – not even – and give your guys the best opportunity to win the game,” Boals said. “At this point in the season, you know, you don’t sleep, and that’s across the country. It’s one of those deals where, with the team and the lack of preparation time, you want to do as much as you can in a short time.” Paulus agreed, adding that being one win away from the Final Four in New Orleans doesn’t make coaches more motivated because they always prepare at a high level. “The effort this staff put forward is always at the highest level,” he said. “If it takes five minutes, which, somehow it never does, you know, that’s great. Other times, it takes a little longer, and this time of year, you want to make sure that you dot your ‘I’s’ and cross your ‘T’s.’” OSU’s East Region final against Syracuse tips Saturday at TD Garden in Boston at 7:05 p.m. read more

Ohio State club football optimistic about future

On a windy, overcast April afternoon at Ohio State, the cleats are laced up, footballs are tossed around and a new offensive scheme is being installed. New coaches and new players provide hope for the upcoming season. This is not the beloved Buckeye varsity football team, however, but the OSU club football team getting ready to enter its fourth season this fall. OSU club football began Spring Quarter 2008. A group of about 25 players made the team and stuck it out through the inaugural season in fall 2009. The team went 1-4 the first year, beating only Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, 28-12. The second year was a similar story for the club. A team of about 35 players competed for the Buckeyes and they made improvements from 2009, but the 2010 squad finished the year with a 2-4 record. Former club president and a player for three years, Nick Herrin, said that despite the tough times the team endured those first two years, it was the most fun he’s ever had playing football. “It was just 18 to 25 guys that just absolutely loved football,” said Herrin, a fourth-year in psychology. In the first two seasons, the team was not lacking in skill or talent, but was simply outmanned when compared to their opponents, Herrin said. “The first year of the club, we had 18 guys that were as good as anybody,” Herrin said. “We were just outnumbered. We go to Xavier and Miami and they’ve got 45 guys.” Despite going 3-8 in the first two years of the club’s existence, the players said the excitement increased prior to the 2011 campaign. Through tryouts, the team was able to increase its roster size to almost 50 players last season. As Herrin said, the increase in the number of players on the team helped. The Buckeyes finished the season 6-0 and ranked No. 3 in the final Intercollegiate Club Football Federation rankings. OSU practices and plays all of its home games at the Lincoln Tower Turf Field, which is located just south of Ohio Stadium. Safety George Shapiro, a third-year in industrial engineering and club president, said looking up at the fourth-largest football stadium in the country makes him feel like “the little brother” at times. He said he doesn’t mind though. “It’s still cool that it’s behind us like that,” Shapiro said. “It’s still very exciting to play in front of the Horseshoe.” The Buckeyes held tryouts last week and added 25 players to a team with 25 players from last season’s undefeated squad. Practice began Monday and will be two days each week until the end of the quarter. The team is making an offensive transition this year, similar to that of the varsity team under coach Urban Meyer. The scheme will be more of a spread offense after last year’s team was more run-oriented, Herrin said. Quarterback Jeff Porter, a second-year in operations management and club vice president, said the biggest thing for the team this spring is to get everyone together and start teaching the new guys. “We’re just trying to teach right now,” Porter said. “We’re just trying to get the new people caught up to what the veterans have learned already so that when it comes time for the fall, we can just jump right in.” Defensive back T.J. Thompson, a second-year in finance, said learning the new schemes is key, but getting everybody excited about playing is the most important thing. “This spring, we want to get everyone just excited for the autumn,” Thompson said. “Everyone just loves playing and has fun.” Looking forward to next season, coach Ray Giesige said it’s going to be hard to duplicate what last year’s team did because of the players that are graduating. Giesige played for the club team the previous two seasons before concussions forced him to switch to a coaching role. The fourth-year in sport and leisure studies said he wanted to stay involved and help continue what he helped start. “I decided I wanted to stick around and help out because it really is a great organization and we’re trying to do good things,” Giesige said. While he said he thinks the team has lost some important players from last year’s team, Giesige is looking to build off the 2011 season and is optimistic about the 2012 Buckeyes. “We lost some key contributors, but the great thing about here is there’s so many people that we can replace them at least a little bit on the talent side,” Giesige said. “We’re looking for people to step up right now and be leaders and if that happens, I think we’ll have a pretty good year.” read more

36 dead as tank battle rocks Yemens Aden

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Chinese consulate gets Joyee footballs thanks to Refugee Handicrafts

first_imgKolkata: With the immense success in Bengal and in other parts of the country, the Refugee Handicrafts have now become successful in making Joyee footballs for the Chinese consulate in Kolkata.Refugee Handicrafts, which was set up in 1950 to help refugees earn their livelihood, had lost all its importance due to the lackadaisical attitude of the erstwhile Left Front government. Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee finally set up the Refugee Handicrafts Managing Committee comprising veteran football players and revived the organisation. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsMaking footballs was one of the key sectors that played a crucial role in revival of Refugee Handicrafts that functions under the supervision of the state MSME department. Manas Bhattacharya, the chairman of the committee, said: “The Chinese Consulate in Kolkata had tested the footballs that were being prepared by us and subsequently they placed an order for 850 Challenger Joyee footballs. The footballs have been supplied to the consulate.””We are hopeful that they will place orders for more number of footballs in future. Besides showing interest for football, there were also queries for other handicraft goods that are being made by members of Refugee Handicrafts,” said Bhattacharya. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedHe further said Joyee footballs are in use at nine centres of the Sports Authority of India (SAI) including Cuttack, Dhanbad and Kolkata. Members of the Refugee Handicrafts mostly women got involved in the making of Joyee footballs and they were provided with the necessary training. They have made more than 1 lakh footballs during the FIFA Under-17 Football World Cup that held in October 2017. The Mamata Banerjee government took several steps to promote the Joyee footballs and the state government had distributed it among Durga Puja organisers ahead of Durga Puja in 2017. The footballs were displayed outside Puja Mandaps and it helped in promotion. Similarly, two footballs were given to each of the 12,000 local clubs in the state ahead of the FIFA Under-17 Football World Cup and to encourage more youth to get involved in playing football. Footballs were also distributed in educational institutions including all high schools, higher secondary schools, high Madrassas and colleges and police lines to promote. Each of these institutions got five footballs.Bhattacharya said the success of Joyee footballs has helped Refugee Handicrafts in its revival and now steps are also being taken for better promotion of other handicraft goods as well.last_img read more

Bengal students pass with flying colours in CBSE Class X exam

first_imgKolkata: The region comprising schools of Bengal recorded a slightly higher pass percentage than the national average in the class X results of Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) announced on Tuesday.As per statistics provided by the CBSE Board, Bhubaneswar region, which includes the state, recorded a pass percentage of 89.27 compared to the overall 86.70 percent recorded at the national level. This region, however, lagged behind three regions namely Thiruvanthapuram (99.6%), Chennai (97.37%) and Ajmer (91%). Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsThe highest marks from Bengal has been likely bagged by Sourit Sarkar, a student of DPS Ruby Park. Sourit, who has secured 99.2 percent loves studying mathematics and physics and aims to pursue research in astronomy.”I had pulled up my socks from the beginning of class X and studied throughout the year. At times, it became a little hectic while juggling between private coaching and school. I treated the board exam just like my school exams. I studied all the text books in detail, not leaving out anything and made it a point to familiarise myself with each and every paragraph. I paid attention to classroom lectures, reference books and modules other than the regular course books,” he said. Sourit also credited his father and said he always emphasised on self-study, which contributed in achieving his goal. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedHe also thanked his school for the support of the faculty, who helped him to turn his weaknesses into strengths.Some of the other toppers from Kolkata include Ayshwarya Ghosh, who scored 494 out of 500 with 98.8 percent and Sayan Maji, who scored 492 out of 500 with the same percentage. Both of them are students of South Point High School. Ushasi Das of Sushila Birla Girls’ School scored 98.4 percent.According to an official of DPS Ruby Park, the overall result of the school was excellent with 346 out of 450 students securing an aggregate score of above 80 percent. In South Point High School, 144 out of 790 students scored above 95 percent and in Sushila Birla Girls’ School, 61 out of 76 got 80 percent and above.Birla High School also fared very well with all the 175 students, who appeared for the examination this year, receiving good marks. Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee, who is currently in Kalimpong, congratulated the students for their success. “Congratulations to all students who excelled and those who passed the CBSE Class 10 exams. Best wishes for all your future endeavours. Good wishes to your teachers and families,” Banerjee tweeted.last_img read more

St Stephens address cancelled Mamata unmoved

first_imgKolkata: Reacting on cancellation of the programme at St Stephen’s College, Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee said she doesn’t mind as the choice was theirs and maintained that she would be attending the Catholic Bishops Conference of India on Tuesday.When asked about the cancellation of her trip to China, Chicago and now her lecture at St Stephen’s College, Banerjee said: “Let them cancel. I don’t mind. Let God save them.”It may be recalled that a Trinamool Congress MP had maintained in connection with the programme at St Stephen’s College on Saturday that ‘Mamata Banerjee is giving the BJP-RSS sleepless nights. Let them keep trying… She cannot be silenced…” Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeSt Stephen’s authorities cancelled a programme of Mamata Banerjee scheduled to be held on August 1 by raising protocol issues. Banerjee was the first Chief Minister who was scheduled to address students of one of the most premier institutions in the country. She further added: “I will be attending the attending the Catholic Bishops Conference of India. It is a major event.”The Chief Minister is the chief guest at the “Love your Neighbour” conference organised by India’s largest Christian body — The Catholic Bishops Conference of India. The event is going to be held on Tuesday. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedWhen asked about the possibility of a meeting with UPA Chairperson Sonia Gandhi, the Chief Minister said while addressing the press conference at Nabanna on Monday: “I heard that she is unwell. But if I get an opportunity, of course, I will meet her.”She further said: “Day after tomorrow I will be going to Parliament. I will meet many people there.” This comes when the Trinamool Congress supremo has given the clarion call to oust the BJP in 2019 general elections and there will be a major rally at Brigade Parade Ground in Kolkata on January 19 in 2019 in which Banerjee will be inviting several anti-BJP leaders. She had also said that the UPA Chairperson will also be invited. In the same breath, Banerjee added: “I have many programmes in Delhi. I will go to the residence of Ram Jethmalaniji where Yashwant Sinhaji, Shatrughan Sinha and Arun Shourie will also be coming. I will be going to Jethmalaniji’s residence at around 5 pm.”It may be recalled that Banerjee had interactions with BJP leaders Yashwant Sinha, Shatrughan Sinha and Arun Shourie during her visit to Delhi in March. According to political experts, the meeting of the Trinamool Congress supremo with the BJP leaders is quite significant in terms of the present political scenario.last_img read more

Remnants of the 1947 partition

first_imgSeven decades have passed since the Partition of 1947 and still remnants of it continue to linger only latently in public memories and histories. The exhibition at India International Centre (IIC), by The 1947 Partition Archive, will unravel the memories of people who witnessed the days of the Divide. This multimedia exhibit will highlight the socio–cultural ethnography and memory of the Partition by bringing forth those voices that have otherwise been unheard; the story of a woman still living in a refugee camp, separated from her daughter due to the man–made border, how two brothers converted to Islam to remain on their land while their sister made her way across to India, and how two brothers travelled from Travancore State to the North–West Frontier Province in search of work and were stranded there due to the Divide. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfEach and every panel of this exhibit presents a unique first-hand experience and displays how the pivotal event that determined the subcontinent’s contemporary history continues to influence society even today. These narratives are from all around the globe, with a special focus on subversive narratives through the lens of class, caste, and gender. The choice of regional locations is diverse and also brings to light the narratives of Partition that are often never considered as part of popular imaginary. This exhibition invites, for the very first, public audiences to engage with exemplary oral histories collected by The 1947 Partition Archive, over the last eight years. Curated by Aanchal Malhotra, it is an exhibition that marries the notions of history, memoir, longing and belonging. ‘Remembering partition: unheard stories’ is on view till September 8, everyday from 11 am to 7 pm at the Art Gallery, Kamaldevi Complex, IIC.last_img read more

Nevada officials reach out to Dbacks on potential

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In This Issue  Aussie trade deficit widens

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