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Half-time: QPR 0 Burnley 0

first_imgJames Perch and Matt Phillips went closest for QPR as they made a lively start to new manager Jimmy Floyd’s Hasselbaink’s first match in charge.Perch’s deflected shot bounced narrowly wide and Burnley keeper Tom Heaton saved with his legs to deny Phillips.Heaton also gathered Leroy Fer’s header from Alejandro Faurlin’s left-wing corner.At the other end, Joey Barton, back at Loftus Road for the first time since leaving QPR during the summer, had a free-kick saved by Rob Green.R’s keeper Green also held a long-range effort from Sam Vokes and just about made it to a back-header from Grant Hall before Clarets striker Andre Gray.With Charlie Austin, who has been nursing a calf problem, on the substitutes’ bench once more, Rangers again started without a recognised striker, with Fer supporting Phillips in attack.QPR: Green, Perch, Onuoha, Hall, Konchesky, Hoilett, Sandro, Faurlin, Henry, Fer, Phillips.Subs: Smithies, Chery, Luongo, Angella, Tozser, Emmanuel-Thomas, Austin.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Change Needed Along Big Muddy

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Chris ClaytonDTN Ag Policy EditorOMAHA (DTN) — Something has to change about the Corps of Engineers’ management of the Missouri River, three governors said Wednesday, though the governors acknowledged they don’t know exactly what that change will look like.After meeting with Corps’ officials about levee repairs and the recovery phase from ongoing flooding, the governors of Iowa, Missouri and Nebraska all said their states have to take more ownership over how the dams and levees are managed along the rivers. They relayed that message to the Corps, said Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds.“This is something that impacts each one of our states collectively and we can’t continue to experience the type of floods we’ve gone through here in the last recent days,” Reynolds said.All three governors are dealing with another round of historic flooding after a freak storm rapidly melted ice and snow across Nebraska, South Dakota and Iowa, flooding larger tributaries and forcing the Corps of Engineers to quickly raise the volume of water releases from Gavins Point Dam on the Missouri River. Communities and farmers along the Missouri River are reeling because many of them suffered similar flooding in 2011.“We have to do something different along the river,” said Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts. “It’s not acceptable for us to continue to experience these types of flooding episodes.”Ricketts said the governors asked the Corps of Engineers about options to change management, up to the point of asking Congress to change laws to focus more resources on flood prevention.Nebraska and Iowa are each looking at more than $1 billion to $1.5 billion in economic damage, roughly, with communities flooded, extensive crop and livestock losses, as well as roads and bridges that could take years to fully rebuild. Missouri farmers haven’t tallied damages, but parts of northwest Missouri are still underwater. Farmers in all three states are facing millions of dollars in losses in grain bins that could be uncompensated without a disaster package. And a significant number of those farmers won’t be able to get a crop in the ground this year.“This is something where we think, as states, we need to be more actively involved with how we are managing the Missouri River to avoid this sort of flooding going forward in the future,” Ricketts said.Missouri Gov. Mike Parson said there have been meetings with the Corps “for far too long” that end with the same result. “It’s time we need some straight-up answers from the Corps of Engineers about how they are managing the river and why we continue to have these situations and getting worse,” Parson said.Parson said the economics of all three states “are totally dependent on the management” of the river. The governors noted Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly wanted to attend Wednesday’s meeting in Council Bluffs, but had travel issues.Short term, Reynolds said, there are four major levee breaks that are still getting inflows of water from the Missouri River, and those levees need to be plugged. Another 50 levees are damaged along the river as well.Parson later added, “We’re still not out of the woods yet. We’ve still got water coming out, ice and snow melt coming out of the Dakotas, plus spring rains that can really affect us.”Ricketts said a particular law, PL-84-99, requires the Corps of Engineers to restore levees back to original authorization, but not higher or wider. With changing conditions on the river, maybe the law needs to be changed to allow larger levees, he said. Ricketts also said permitting to build levees can take years to complete as well. Permit approval needs to be faster, he said. Ricketts also suggested, with infrastructure changes, that could require more land buyouts as well.Reynolds said temporary levees built for protection from this flood also need to be factored into the permanent levee process going forward. In Hamburg, Iowa, the Corps required local officials to take down a temporary levee in 2011 that would have provided better protection for the community this time, but Hamburg was quickly overtaken last month by floodwaters.Corps officials talked with the governors about the releases from Gavins Point Dam, which reached 100,000 cubic feet per second at one point. Currently, Gavins Point releases are at about 39,000 cubic feet per second (cfs). Corps officials said Wednesday releases are forecast to increase to 55,000 cfs early next week.Ricketts noted Gavins Point wasn’t meant to be a major flood-protection dam.“Gavins Point is not designed to have much storage capacity, in general,” Ricketts noted. A lot of the flow going into the Missouri River was below the dam, including from the Platte River, which was hitting 10 times its normal flows. Most of the major levee breaches on the Missouri River came below where the Platte flows into the Missouri. “So there was a lot coming into the Missouri from the Platte and other tributaries that was uncontrolled,” Ricketts said.Other permitted levee changes, though, might have avoided flooding such as at Offutt Air Force Base in Nebraska, which suffered hundreds of millions of dollars in damage. Building higher levees, though, has a ripple effect of its own of pressuring other communities. Higher levees downstream, for instance, would translate into more flooding in major cities such as Omaha and Council Bluffs.“That’s why we are here,” Reynolds said. “We can’t build higher on the Iowa side and dump it on Peter (Ricketts in Nebraska) or Mike (Parson in Missouri). That’s why the three of us are here and committed to taking a look at this from a regional perspective.”Looking at the state level, Parson said there are questions whether there can be more reservoirs on the Missouri River or tributaries to handle heavy water flows, as well as more levees.While the governors acknowledged they were hit with “a perfect storm,” as Reynolds called it, Parson said he thinks part of the problem was the Corps changed river management strategies in 2004 and no longer focused on flood control.“I think the states are going to have to take more of a role in the management of the river, and the Corps is going to have to work with us from a different perspective from what we’ve done in the past,” Parson said. He later added, “I think we just kind of have to get back to basics on managing the rivers, and we should have a say in that management part of that.”Along with that, the governors added that the federal government will have to come in with a disaster package to help the states recover. They called on Congress to pass its disaster package, which got hung up in the Senate earlier this week.Chris Clayton can be reached at [email protected] him on Twitter @ChrisClaytonDTN(PS/AG)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

CONIFA 2018 World Football Cup: Teams, dates & TV

first_imgConIFA World Football Cup Teams, fixtures and everything you need to know about the CONIFA 2018 World Football Cup Goal Last updated 1 year ago 22:26 2/17/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Conifa ConIFA World Football Cup Sixteen teams will compete for the chance to be CONIFA World Football Cup winners this summer, so Goal takes a look at everything you need to know The CONIFA 2018 World Football Cup will take place in London this summer, with the Barawa Football Association hosting tournament.“We are thrilled to be taking CONIFA to England – the spiritual home of football,” said CONIFA President Per-Anders Blind.AdChoices广告“The World Football Cup just gets bigger and bigger. After hosting our inaugural tournament in Sweden in 2014, we reached new heights in Abkhazia last year with an event that received media coverage on every inhabited continent. Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player “We are confident 2018 will be our best tournament yet, and London will be the perfect host.”With the tournament now only months away, Goal takes a look at everything you need to know.WHAT IS THE CONIFA WORLD FOOTBALL CUP? Conifa 3The Confederation of Independent Football Associations (CONIFA) 2018 World Football Cup is an international football tournament for states, minorities, stateless peoples and regions unaffiliated with FIFA organised by ConIFA. Barawa, a region of Somalia, are this year recognised as hosts of the tournament, though the entire competition will take place in London as the Barawa Football Association is based in the capital.WHEN IS THE WORLD FOOTBALL CUP? The games will take place between May 31 2018 and Jun 9 2018 .WHERE WILL THE GAMES BE PLAYED? Numerous stadiums around London will be hosting World Football Cup matches. To date, three host venues have been announced:Gander Green Lane , home of Sutton United, will host a number of games. The stadium’s pitch is of FIFA 2-Star quality, FIFA’s highest rating for 3G artificial pitches, and has a capacity of 5,013.Hayes Lane , also holding around 5,000 people, will share a spread of fixtures. The ground is used by Bromley Football Club, Cray Wanderers and Crystal Palace Ladies.Queen Elizabeth II Stadium , the smallest of the three stadiums, is housed in Enfield and holds approximately 2,500 spectators.WHO HAS QUALIFIED? conifa 2Sixteen teams will take part in the competition, with Barawa the recognised hosts.Six of the competing sides are representing Europe, five are from Asia, three from Africa, one from North America, and one from Oceania. TEAM REGION METHOD OF QUALIFICATION  Tamil Eelam Asia CONIFA Challenger Cup winners  Abkhazia Europe CONIFA World Football Cup Winners Felvidek Europe Hungary Heritage Cup winners Western Armenia Asia Wild Card Barawa Africa Host  Tibet Asia Wild Card  Kiribati Oceania Regional qualification  Cascadia North America Regional qualification  Padania Europe CONIFA European Football Cup Winners  Northern Cyprus Europe CONIFA European Football Cup Runners Up Panjab Asia Regional qualification United Koreans of Japan Asia Regional qualification Matabeleland Africa Regional qualification Kabylie Africa Regional qualification Ellan Vannin Europe Regional qualification Székely Land Europe Regional qualification GROUPS, DATES AND OPENING FIXTURES Group A consists of Barawa, Ellan Vannin, Tamil Eelam, and Cascadia. Group A PL W D L GF GA GD PTS     Barawa  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0   Ellan Vannin 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  Tamil Eelam 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Cascadia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Group B consists of Abkhazia, Northern Cyprus, Felvidék, and Tibet. Group B PL W D L GF GA GD PTS Abkhazia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Northern Cyprus 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Felvidék 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Tibet 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Group C consists of Padania, Székely Land, Kiribati, and Matabeleland. Group C PL W D L GF GA GD PTS Padania 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Székely Land 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kiribati 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Matabeleland      0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Group D consists of Panjab, United Koreans of Japan, Western Armenia, and Kabylie. Group D PL W D L GF GA GD PTS Panjab 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 UK of Japan 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Western Armenia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kabylie 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 The opening fixtures of the competition will take place on May 31 2018, with Ellan Vannin taking on Cascadia, and Barawa going up against Tamil Eelam.On the same day, Abkhazia face Tibet and Northern Cyprus face Felvidék in Group B, while Padania vs Matabeleland and Kiribati vs Székely Land takes place on the same day.Panjab vs Kabylie, and United Koreans of Japan vs Western Armenia will also go ahead on May 31.The quarter-final stage of the tournament will take place on June 5, the semi-final on June 7, and the third-place play-off on June 9.The final will also take place on June 9, with the venue to be decided.last_img read more

8 days agoArsenal management rubbish injury doubts for William Saliba

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Arsenal management rubbish injury doubts for William Salibaby Paul Vegas8 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal management have rubbished injury doubts for William Saliba.There’s been claims from The Athletic of concerns regarding the defender’s ‘groin strength’.But the Metro says the club are confident he will be ready to compete for a first-team spot next season. Saliba joined Arsenal from St Etienne in the summer and was immediately loaned back to the French club.But Arsenal soon got a chance to have a closer look at the 18-year-old centre-back as he visited their London Colney training base after being ruled out of the first seven games of the season with a hamstring injury.Saliba eventually made his return to action in Ligue 1, making his first three appearances of the season prior to the current international break. last_img read more

Minors marriage thwarted

first_imgKolkata: A child marriage was stopped after officials from a city-based NGO rescued the girl from Sarat Ghosh Garden Road on Friday.The incident came to light when the welfare organization officials acted on a tip-off and stopped the girl’s parents from conducting the marriage. The officials went to the 16-year-old girl’s home who was about to get married with the consent of her parents. The officials asked the girl’s parents to show the age proof of her daughter. When her parents hesitated to disclose her age, the officials counselled the parents and convinced them to make arrangement of her daughter’s marriage once she reaches the age of 18. However, the girl has been handed over to the parents. She will be produced before the Child Welfare Committee (CWC) latest by August 20. According to National Commission for Protection of Child Rights (NCPCR) released recently, the prevalence of child marriage in India is the highest amongst Scheduled Tribe girls (15 per cent) followed by Scheduled Castes (13 per cent). This apart, West Bengal has the highest rate of child marriage amongst SC girls.last_img read more

Indie Crossword Puzzlers Are Shaking Up A Very Square World

The New York Times3.5 The Washington Post3.9 BuzzFeed3.7 Wall Street Journal3.4 Newsday3.9 CrosSynergy3.3 The Times’ puzzle, though, isn’t the most highly rated on the Web. Indies may be ragtag, but their quality can be remarkably high. The popular blog Diary of a Crossword Fiend lets readers rate a selection of puzzles each day, from one to five stars. Indies do well, with indie icon Matt Gaffney’s topping the list and American Values Club and Quigley’s puzzles averaging above the Times so far this year. (Note, of course, that these ratings are subjective, and come from a highly selected sample of the universe of crossword solvers, namely those who rate crosswords on a crossword blog.)But that the indies are well-received doesn’t make them well-compensated. They’re wrestling with the same confusion about sustainable business models as all the other media upstarts.The New York Times has it relatively easy, with nearly 200,000 digital crossword subscribers, good for over $2 million in revenue in the first quarter of 2016, according to a company press release. When you figure in the hardcopy subscriptions and newsstand purchases due to the puzzle, plus the countless book collections, the Times crossword puzzle is almost certainly worth well north of $10 million a year. (The Times wouldn’t comment beyond what was disclosed in the press release.) Little of that money goes to the constructors: At its rate of $300 for a daily puzzle and $1,000 for a Sunday, I estimate that a little less than $150,000 a year is paid to the crossword constructors themselves.Outside the Times, though, monetization approaches vary wildly. The American Values Club crossword, the indie edited by Tausig, is subscription based. A year’s worth of puzzles is $20, or you can get a single puzzle for a buck, and proceeds are divvied up among constructors quarterly. Depending on the quarter, this model can yield more than the Times’ $300-per-puzzle rate, according to Tausig. “I’ve been a constructor for a long time, and also because I’m a hardcore Marxist, I want to put my money where my mouth is,” he said. Constructors there also retain some future rights to their puzzles. Tausig didn’t give me a precise count of his subscribers, but said there were no fewer than 3,000.Quigley, who runs an eponymous site, was inspired by Radiohead’s 2007 release of “In Rainbows” when he created his pay-what-you-want model. He publishes free puzzles on Mondays and Thursdays, and provides a “tip your constructor” PayPal link on his homepage. Between direct payments and the advertisement it provides for other paying puzzle gigs, Quigley estimated that his site is responsible for two-thirds of his income. He claimed an average of 12,000 people solve a typical puzzle on his site.And Matt Gaffney — whom other indie constructors described to me as the “juggernaut” and the “silverback gorilla” of the field and who tops the ratings list — oversees a mini-factory that publishes eight puzzles a week. About a year ago, Gaffney switched to a subscription-only model for his daily puzzle ($24 a year) which, he told me, has 500 to 600 subscribers. “It seems to be kind of the wave of the future,” he said. “But I think big media, regular media and indie puzzles will always coexist and coevolve for the foreseeable future. I don’t see one putting the other out of business.” Despite that, indies “are where all the crazy, new, fun stuff is happening.”In many ways, the crossword tumult mirrors that of the broader media world, pockmarked with hirings, firings, launches, closings and scandal. BuzzFeed hit the brakes, and USA Today ousted its crossword editor in May. But others hit the gas. The Wall Street Journal added a daily puzzle last September, and The Washington Post tapped a new crossword constructor in November. And Slate, stalwart of internet media, will feature the American Values Club crossword in its paid section, Slate Plus, starting in September.Madison, the former BuzzFeed editor, who has interned for both Shortz and Tausig, is heading back to the indie world himself. According to Madison, the BuzzFeed puzzle’s average 40,000 to 50,000 views didn’t justify its cost at the virally oriented site. (I emailed BuzzFeed for comment but have not yet received one.) He recently announced a new crossword project called Solve the Internet. Details were sketchy, but the description he gave me was heavy on “internet” and “social.” Madison wouldn’t offer a specific launch date but said to expect it soon.“I don’t understand what he’s talking about, but that’s a fantastic thing,” Quigley, 42, said of Madison’s puzzle ideas. “If we don’t go out and try to bring in that younger generation, we’ve got the buggy whip, and we’re gonna get blown out by something else.” Fireball3.9 Jonesin’ Crosswords3.3 Crossword Nation3.9 Brendan Emmett Quigley3.7 Los Angeles Times3.6 Matt Gaffney4.0 American Values Club3.6 Most highly rated crosswords Gawker wasn’t the only irreverent, iconoclastic internet media property to say farewell recently. To a much quieter dirge, the BuzzFeed crossword puzzle published its final edition this month. Its editor, 23-year-old puzzle wunderkind Caleb Madison, for whom this was his first job, left the company to strike out on his own.The BuzzFeed crossword, which launched in October, promised a millennial upheaval to the musty crossword genre: an internet-native, slang-fluent, pop-culture-obsessed puzzle aimed at young solvers. There was hope, given BuzzFeed’s large amounts of traffic, that it would serve as a meaningful competitor to the starchy, hegemonic New York Times crossword. “BuzzFeed Is Revolutionizing the Crossword Puzzle,” an Observer headline declared last year.It didn’t. Yet while BuzzFeed’s puzzle revolution fizzled, a devoted band of ragtag agitators remains devoted to the cause. A vibrant ecosystem of independent crosswords — “indies” — exists on the internet, its component puzzles multiplying and evolving, finding their niche and trying to find ways to survive. And some of them can outrate the gold standard over at the Times.“I think of the indie world like we’re all craft beer brewers,” Brendan Emmett Quigley, a professional puzzle constructor, told me. The Times is a Budweiser lager; the indies are small-batch saisons and IPAs.“My favorite thing about indie puzzles is the timeliness,” Neville Fogarty, an avid indie solver who helped found the Indie 500 crossword tournament, told me. Indie puzzles don’t have to wait months in a publication queue, as they would at the Times. They also aren’t subject to the stylistic constraints of a large media institution. Topics and themes, however recent, modern, niche or profane, are fair game. Nor are they subject to the physical constraints of a major newspaper. With few exceptions, all daily Times puzzles use 15-by-15 grids with rotational symmetry, a convention indies can and do break.Over (craft) beers recently, Ben Tausig,1It was Tausig whose tweet, about a suspiciously duplicated puzzle, eventually led to the FiveThirtyEight investigation into accusations of plagiarism against the crossword editor Timothy Parker. the editor of the acclaimed indie American Values Club crossword, reflected on the early days of indies, over a decade ago. “We were all out in the woods,” he said. “Papers were dying, papers were dropping their crosswords.” And so some crossword designers decided to go it alone. A risky proposition, but one that came with aesthetic upside. These sylvan constructors could rewrite the stylebook. “Crosswords were staid, you know? As much as I enjoyed them, there was always this feeling that the voice of the Times was not my generational voice. It was like, what if you made a crossword about rap, or something? That felt really radical at the time.”Criticism of the Times puzzle seems to have expanded of late, beyond the stylistic and into the political. It’s not just that the Times puzzle is staid, or geared toward olds. It’s been accused of tone deafness on issues of race and gender. A recent clue for the answer HAREM was “Decidedly nonfeminist women’s group,” and the clue “Exasperated comment from a feminist” led to the answer MEN. “Gangsta rap characters” were THUGS.But Will Shortz, the Times puzzle editor since 1993, is an icon for a reason. All the constructors I spoke to praised him for elevating the Times puzzle to its current station. “The Times’ job is arguably much harder, because they have to walk that thin line of making sure everyone is included,” Quigley said. It’s come a long way, too. The Times published its first crossword in 1942. If you scrape off a thick layer of dust, you’ll find a puzzle riddled with obscurities (the poets CRABBE and TASSO, the seaport HAGI, the Dutch town EDE) and ditchwater-dull clues (both IAN and YVON are clued as “Man’s name”). And even if some indie puzzlers would like to foment a revolution, it already took one to get the Times to the solid position it’s in today. Shortz oversaw a transition away from the dryest trivia to a puzzle that does include some popular culture. He has said that anything the paper covers should be fair game for the crossword.“The Times’ crossword audience is broad, from teens up to as old as people get,” Shortz told me in an email. “But the average [age] is higher than that for the indies. So in terms of overall tone and cultural references, the Times puzzle will skew a little older than the indies.” Shortz also mentioned the need for the Times puzzle to have a longer shelf life than the indies, which means it eschews some timelier subjects. The puzzle appears in syndication six weeks after its original publication, and sometimes in books years later. Boston Globe3.1 Chronicle of Higher Education3.3 Includes puzzles appearing at least ten times. Ratings are out of 5.Source: Diary of a Crossword Fiend PUZZLEAVG. USER RATING read more

UNC shows OSU womens soccer whos No 1

Ohio State women’s soccer coach Lori Walker said her team battled and played well against No. 1-ranked University of North Carolina on Sunday, but not well enough as the No. 18-ranked Buckeyes lost, 3-0. UNC (4-0-0) used a first-half goal from junior midfielder Amber Brooks to open the scoring and silence a Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium crowd of 2,892. A second-half goal from sophomore forward Khelia Ohai doubled the Tar Heels’ lead and a late tap-in by senior forward Emmalie Pfankuch provided all the offense needed to upend the Buckeyes (3-2-0). “Any time the No. 1 team comes in your house and battles and your squad makes a game of it, there’s something to be proud of,” Walker said after the game. “There’s a lot we’re going to learn from this match.” The opening half-hour of play saw the Buckeyes and Tar Heels split possession, but OSU was the first to threaten to score. A Tar Heels turnover in the 11th minute sent play in the opposite direction and after collecting the ball, OSU junior forward Tiffany Cameron attempted to play freshman forward Ellyn Gruber toward UNC’s goal. Senior keeper Gay Adelaide scurried forward and kicked the ball out of play before Gruber could reach through-ball. OSU threatened again in the 31st minute when junior midfielder Aly Walker slipped behind UNC’s back line. Walker took a lofted pass and nodded a shot on goal, but Adelaide again came forward and was able to knock the headed shot aside. Adelaide would finish the match with three saves. The Tar Heels opened the scoring in the 35th minute after referee Michael Allie awarded UNC a free kick just outside the Buckeyes’ penalty area. The ensuing strike from Brooks — a low, driven shot on goal — took a deflection before glancing off the hand of Buckeyes’ senior keeper Katie Baumgardner. “I got a hand on (the shot),” Baumgardner said. “If I could take it back, I would. It was a little out of my control.” Baumgardner would go on to save two of UNC’s five on-target shots in the match. The Tar Heels took a 1-0 into halftime, but OSU took the game to UNC shortly after play resumed. In the 55th minute, Buckeyes senior forward Paige Maxwell dribbled up field, shook her defender and fired a shot from about 20 yards out that beat Adelaide, but caromed off the crossbar and out of play. “I was probably leaning back too much because I thought it was a closer shot,” Maxwell said. “I guess I leaned a little high. I should have tried to place it.” Four minutes later, UNC made the Buckeyes pay for Maxwell’s missed opportunity. Ohai collected the ball inside OSU’s penalty area, cut the ball back to create space and then calmly deposited a shot into the back of Baumgardner’s net to put the Tar Heels up 2-0. “The goal that Ohai created — if the kid can stop on a dime and keep her feet to shoot, the kid deserves a goal,” Lori Walker said of UNC’s second goal. Brooks then assisted on another UNC goal 18 minutes later. Brooks floated a cross off a set piece into the Buckeyes’ penalty area in the 77th minute. Sophomore forward Elizabeth Burchenal corralled the ball inside the six-yard box and rolled it across the face of Baumgardner’s goal to Pfankuch. Pfankuch then scored a tap-in goal to round out UNC’s offensive production in the match. “We gave up two goals on set pieces — that’s a mental thing,” Lori Walker said. “We’ve got to do better than that.” UNC denied the Buckeyes’ forwards at nearly every turn over the final 13 minutes and went on collect its first shutout of the season. After the game, Baumgardner said there were many positives to glean from the night’s result. “The kind of pressure that we played under, with (UNC) being so good and so technical, is really going to help us in the future,” Baumgardner said. Lori Walker agreed, saying she hoped for a future encounter with a No. 1-ranked team. “For us, the preparation that we get from this match will help us in the Big Ten conference,” she said. “Ultimately, you want to meet the No.1 team later on in the year.” OSU continues its regular season next Sunday at home with a 6 p.m. game against Ohio University. read more

No rest for weary Buckeyes coaches

BOSTON – There was no point in asking members of the Ohio State men’s basketball team’s coaching staff what time they thought they would finishing watching tape Friday morning – they didn’t know. You can bet it was late, though. The OSU staff has now guided the No. 2-seeded Buckeyes (30-7) to an Elite Eight appearance in the NCAA Tournament after the team’s 81-66 win against No. 6-seeded Cincinnati Thursday at TD Garden in Boston, but they aren’t done yet. Two OSU coaches said they will spare no effort in helping prepare their team for Saturday’s East Region final against top-seeded Syracuse (34-2), even if means losing a few more hours of sleep. First-year OSU video coordinator and former Duke guard Greg Paulus said he and other coaches would continue preparation for Saturday’s game in the wee hours of Friday morning where they will begin film study. “We’ll watch some film (this morning), you know, whether that’s breaking down this game (against Cincinnati) or watching some Syracuse,” Paulus said. “You just watch them and try to get familiar with them.” Paulus said he didn’t know what time the coaches would take a break for some sleep on Friday, but said they wouldn’t stop until they feel like they understand their opponent. “Whatever it takes,” Paulus said. OSU assistant coach Jeff Boals said that the short turnaround for postseason games is the main contributor to late nights put in by coaches all over the country. “With a one-day prep … you have so much film on them, and you try to prepare as good of a game plan in a 48 hour timespan – not even – and give your guys the best opportunity to win the game,” Boals said. “At this point in the season, you know, you don’t sleep, and that’s across the country. It’s one of those deals where, with the team and the lack of preparation time, you want to do as much as you can in a short time.” Paulus agreed, adding that being one win away from the Final Four in New Orleans doesn’t make coaches more motivated because they always prepare at a high level. “The effort this staff put forward is always at the highest level,” he said. “If it takes five minutes, which, somehow it never does, you know, that’s great. Other times, it takes a little longer, and this time of year, you want to make sure that you dot your ‘I’s’ and cross your ‘T’s.’” OSU’s East Region final against Syracuse tips Saturday at TD Garden in Boston at 7:05 p.m. read more

Ohio State club football optimistic about future

On a windy, overcast April afternoon at Ohio State, the cleats are laced up, footballs are tossed around and a new offensive scheme is being installed. New coaches and new players provide hope for the upcoming season. This is not the beloved Buckeye varsity football team, however, but the OSU club football team getting ready to enter its fourth season this fall. OSU club football began Spring Quarter 2008. A group of about 25 players made the team and stuck it out through the inaugural season in fall 2009. The team went 1-4 the first year, beating only Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, 28-12. The second year was a similar story for the club. A team of about 35 players competed for the Buckeyes and they made improvements from 2009, but the 2010 squad finished the year with a 2-4 record. Former club president and a player for three years, Nick Herrin, said that despite the tough times the team endured those first two years, it was the most fun he’s ever had playing football. “It was just 18 to 25 guys that just absolutely loved football,” said Herrin, a fourth-year in psychology. In the first two seasons, the team was not lacking in skill or talent, but was simply outmanned when compared to their opponents, Herrin said. “The first year of the club, we had 18 guys that were as good as anybody,” Herrin said. “We were just outnumbered. We go to Xavier and Miami and they’ve got 45 guys.” Despite going 3-8 in the first two years of the club’s existence, the players said the excitement increased prior to the 2011 campaign. Through tryouts, the team was able to increase its roster size to almost 50 players last season. As Herrin said, the increase in the number of players on the team helped. The Buckeyes finished the season 6-0 and ranked No. 3 in the final Intercollegiate Club Football Federation rankings. OSU practices and plays all of its home games at the Lincoln Tower Turf Field, which is located just south of Ohio Stadium. Safety George Shapiro, a third-year in industrial engineering and club president, said looking up at the fourth-largest football stadium in the country makes him feel like “the little brother” at times. He said he doesn’t mind though. “It’s still cool that it’s behind us like that,” Shapiro said. “It’s still very exciting to play in front of the Horseshoe.” The Buckeyes held tryouts last week and added 25 players to a team with 25 players from last season’s undefeated squad. Practice began Monday and will be two days each week until the end of the quarter. The team is making an offensive transition this year, similar to that of the varsity team under coach Urban Meyer. The scheme will be more of a spread offense after last year’s team was more run-oriented, Herrin said. Quarterback Jeff Porter, a second-year in operations management and club vice president, said the biggest thing for the team this spring is to get everyone together and start teaching the new guys. “We’re just trying to teach right now,” Porter said. “We’re just trying to get the new people caught up to what the veterans have learned already so that when it comes time for the fall, we can just jump right in.” Defensive back T.J. Thompson, a second-year in finance, said learning the new schemes is key, but getting everybody excited about playing is the most important thing. “This spring, we want to get everyone just excited for the autumn,” Thompson said. “Everyone just loves playing and has fun.” Looking forward to next season, coach Ray Giesige said it’s going to be hard to duplicate what last year’s team did because of the players that are graduating. Giesige played for the club team the previous two seasons before concussions forced him to switch to a coaching role. The fourth-year in sport and leisure studies said he wanted to stay involved and help continue what he helped start. “I decided I wanted to stick around and help out because it really is a great organization and we’re trying to do good things,” Giesige said. While he said he thinks the team has lost some important players from last year’s team, Giesige is looking to build off the 2011 season and is optimistic about the 2012 Buckeyes. “We lost some key contributors, but the great thing about here is there’s so many people that we can replace them at least a little bit on the talent side,” Giesige said. “We’re looking for people to step up right now and be leaders and if that happens, I think we’ll have a pretty good year.” read more

Ohio States Lenzelle Smith Jr Guys gotta get their confidence back

Senior guard Lenzelle Smith Jr. (32) drives to the basket during a game against Northwestern Feb. 19 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU won, 76-60.Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorCollege basketball seasons are bound to come with their respective twists and turns. Even an unblemished record doesn’t come without an off night or a close game.One day a team can be seemingly nailing every shot it takes and blowing out opponents while on the next, it can’t hit the broad side of a barn.During the Ohio State men’s basketball team’s current two-game losing streak, the Buckeyes (22-8, 9-8, sixth in the Big Ten) have experienced more of the latter.In particular, shooting from long range has been a struggle for OSU in losses to Penn State and Indiana.Against the Nittany Lions, coach Thad Matta’s team shot a pedestrian 29.4 percent from beyond the arc. As rough as that performance was, it paled in comparison to what OSU did against Indiana Sunday.For the first time since Jan. 10, 2004, OSU failed to connect from three-point land, missing all 11 of its attempts, and fell to the Hoosiers, 72-64.Senior guard Lenzelle Smith Jr. said after the loss to Indiana, the struggles from beyond the arc are an easy fix, however.“Shooting, that’s about confidence,” Smith Jr. said in an interview with Cleveland.com. “Guys gotta get their confidence back and we’ve got shooters so there’s no excuse. We’ve got to put the ball in the bucket. We’ve got guys who can make threes and we’ve got to step up and obviously put the ball in the bucket.”Smith Jr. tied junior forward LaQuinton Ross for a team-high with 19 points against the Hoosiers and shot 60 percent from the floor, but he missed both of his attempts from beyond the arc. He also shot just 1-6 from deep against Penn State.Matta said he has sensed confidence is dipping for OSU, especially when pressure is turned up.“We were rolling until Thursday night (against Penn State), in all seriousness,” Matta said to Cleveland.com after the loss to Indiana. “I think we’re really lacking in a confidence issue, we’re lacking in a toughness issue in terms of playing through situations. Those are things that somehow, some way, we’ve got to get corrected.”The Buckeyes’ need to regain their confidence is a high priority as the regular season draws to a close. They currently sit half a game behind Iowa and Nebraska in the Big Ten standings, who are tied for fourth in the Big Ten. The top four teams in the standings receive a first-round bye in the Big Ten Tournament, set to begin March 13.Smith Jr. was quick to add that even though the confidence has been lacking lately, the mood in the locker room doesn’t give any reason to believe the trend will continue.“We’re a great team when we come to execute and when we’re on top of our game,” Smith Jr. said to Cleveland.com. “I said we can beat any team in the country, and I’m going to stick by that … I should be happy with what we should produce at the end of the season.“I’m not panicking. I’m not worried about anything.”Since using a huge second half to beat Minnesota, 64-46, Feb. 22, it appears something has been off with the team.Ross said in an interview with Cleveland.com a big part of that is a lack of focus — something that could become a big problem if it is allowed to continue.“We just get too comfortable at times during the game, thinking we’ve got the lead and (that) we’re going to be able to hold it,” Ross said of the 21-5 run the Buckeyes allowed against Indiana, which the Hoosiers used to take the lead for good. “Not thinking that those other teams we’re playing are just as good as us. They’re putting their foot on the gas, and we’re taking ours off it.”Ross, OSU’s leading scorer, knows a thing or two about losing focus during a game. Ross was ejected during OSU’s game against Northwestern for shoving a player and committed a technical foul against Indiana for a similar infraction.Those are the type of things that can prove costly, Matta said, especially late in the season.“I told LaQuinton: ‘Hey, man, you get a technical foul and it’s your second foul and then you’re having your way in the second half and you foul out of the game,’” Matta said to Cleveland.com. “Little things. Those are the types of things that say, ‘Hey, we’ve got to get our concentration back, get our focus back and an understanding of what we’re doing.’”OSU’s next opportunity to try working through the rough spots in its play comes against No. 22 Michigan State (22-7, 11-5, tied for second in the Big Ten) when the Spartans are set to come to Columbus Sunday. Tipoff is slated for 4:30 p.m. read more

Jupp Heynckes named German coach of the year

first_imgBayern Munich’s recently retired coach Jupp Heynckes has been voted the best manager in GermanyThe 73-year-old replaced the fired Carlo Ancelotti on an interim basis in October last year following a disastrous start to their campaign and his arrival was largely credited for their success with Bayern going on to secure a sixth successive Bundesliga crown and finishing 21 points ahead of their nearest rivals.Heynckes was named as the German coach of the year last weekend after his 91 votes edged out the 89 votes that Schalke’s young manager Dominico Tedesco had won.New Bayern boss Niko Kovac came third with 77 votes following an impressive campaign with Eintracht Frankfurt.Jadon SanchoMerson believes Arsenal should sign Sancho Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund winger Jadon Sancho might be the perfect player to play for the Gunners, according to former England international Paul Merson.“It’s particularly nice to see an older coach win the vote in times marked by a certain obsession with youth,” said Bayern president Uli Hoeneß on the club website.“Jupp Heynckes has absolutely earned this award because it is so unusual for a man to be introduced to such a tricky situation, completely turn it around from day one and see it through to the end.”Heynckes has now won the award four times throughout his managerial career following previous triumphs in 1981, 1986 and 2013.last_img read more

Ministry of Finance issues guidelines for Financial Institutions with US and UK

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 08 Dec 2015 – Since December of 2014, the Turks and Caicos signed an Intergovernmental agreement or IGA so that the laws of the US FATCA or Foreign Accounts Tax Compliance Act and the UK equivalent could have force in these islands. Last month, the Ministry of Finance issued some guidance notes to companies working with clients of the two countries on how the monies of these clients ought be handled based on that agreement which had been almost two years in the making. Magnetic Media asked Drexwell Seymour, a CPA and CEO of HLB what advice he would give to his clients regarding the 164 document and it’s stipulations; Seymour said: “I would encourage all US citizens and UK citizens to ensure that they reflect all of their deposits and investments in the TCI with the relevant US and UK authorities.” Seymour explained that this honesty is what these larger nations are looking for and failure to comply is so fiscally painful that a breach by a Turks and Caicos company is highly unlikely. “In any event the local financial institutions will release the information because if they do not, they will face a withholding tax of 30 percent.”TCIG advised that while the recently released, ‘Guidance Notes’ are not law, they do carry the spirit of the FATCA and IGA signed with the United States and the United Kingdom which are equivalent to having Tax Information Exchange Agreements. The Ministry of Finance also shared that while there is no law to make TCI financial institutions adhere, there is an Exchange of Information Unit , or EIU which is authorized to monitor the compliance of local companies who are reported to them by the US or UK. TCI and South Africa have tax agreement signed Recommended for you Related Items:drexwell seymour. ministry of finance, fatca, HLB, Tax Information Exchange Agreement Small business conference Residents say TCI doing enough; not a tax havenlast_img read more

Abdulrahman believes the UAE can still win Asian Cup

first_imgFor United Arab Emirates icon Omar Abdulrahman, his team can still win the 2019 AFC Asian Cup as they only tied 1-1 with Bahrain.The United Arab Emirates and Bahrain tied 1-1 in the opening match of the 2019 AFC Asian Cup.The Emirati team has only won twice in the last ten matches, and this has worried the fans and press.“The team carries the hopes and dreams of all the people of the UAE and needs the efforts of all,” Abdulrahman told Sport 360.“We must all be keen to support and encourage players. Whatever the outcome, the championship is still long and the team still has a great chance of progressing further in this tournament.”ABU DHABI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - FEBRUARY 01: Abdelkarim Hassan of Qatar celebrates with a teammate following their sides victory during the AFC Asian Cup final match between Japan and Qatar at Zayed Sports City Stadium on February 1, 2019 in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. (Photo by Francois Nel/Getty Images)Qatar will plan soon how to aim higher Manuel R. Medina – February 3, 2019 The Qatari national team won the AFC Asian Cup for the first time ever, but the 2022 FIFA World Cup hosts don’t want it to end there.“The Whites led well but did not succeed in achieving the victory that was awaited by fans of UAE football against Bahrain,” he added.“Luck did not win in this confrontation, but I wish success to players in both of the next two games against India and Thailand.”“We need to support the Whites to the end, I have confidence in the ability of the team to reach the second round and continue the quest for the title,” he explained.“The public will support the players a lot, and raise their spirits to do their best, to achieve the desired results.”last_img read more

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How Would Houston React To Tariffs On Chinese Trade

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