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Mayweather squandered $1bn fortune – Amir Khan

first_img “He spends a lot of money, but I don’t know if he’s ever going to want to come back. As I said, maybe he’s going to.” Mayweather is said to have earned $1billion throughout his career, but has faced accusations by McGregor and former friend 50 Cent that he has somehow blown all his cash. The former pay-per-view king has shot down the speculation linking him with a rematch against Manny Pacquiao – who he beat in 2015 – but said he would “absolutely” face McGregor again, or UFC champion Khabib Nurmagomedov. Khan thinks 41-year-old PacMan, the current WBA welterweight champion, may be influencing Mayweather to make a return to the ring, even without fighting him. read also:Joshua is scared of Wilder – Amir Khan He explained: “He’s (Floyd) been out of the ring a long time and he is getting older. You have to remember his age, he’s 43 years old. “Obviously, you’ve still got Manny Pacquiao going at 41. Mayweather might see that and think I can keep going boxing as well.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Mayweather officially retired in 2017 after beating UFC star Conor McGregor, but sparked comeback rumours last November after announcing he was “coming out of retirement in 2020”. The 43-year-old – who followed a unique training regime throughout his unbeaten career – has since uploaded videos of himself back in the gym, even returning to sparring. And Brit Khan, who tirelessly chased a fight against Mayweather but to no avail, reckons the 50-0 US star could be preparing to lace up the gloves again because he is in need of another payday. He told World Boxing News: “I mean, Floyd Mayweather, to fight again? – At the end of the day, I don’t know. “Floyd Mayweather is one of those fighters who might have spent up (all his money) and might have to come back to the ring again.Advertisement English boxer, Amir Khan believes old rival Floyd Mayweather may only be plotting a boxing return because he has spent all of his fortune. Loading… Promoted Content7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The UniverseWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?The Highest Paid Football Players In The World5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksSuperhero Castings That People Hated But Were AmazingBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadePlus-Size Girls Who Set The Catwalk On FireBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?Top 10 Female Stars Everyone Had A Crush On In The 90s7 Train Stations In The World You Wish To Stay At LongerTop 9 Scariest Haunted Castles In Europelast_img read more

NBA trade rumors: Rockets target Lakers guard Kentavious​ Caldwell-Pope

first_imgThe Rockets are targeting Lakers guard Kentavious Caldwell-Pope as part of a three-team trade with the Lakers and Suns, according to The Athletic, which cited unidentified sources. The report adds that the Rockets are “in desperate search for an upgrade at the wing” and that the Lakers, along with several other contenders, have shown interest in Suns small forward Trevor Ariza. The Rockets (12-14) will host the Lakers (17-10) on Thursday with tipoff set for 8 p.m. ET. NBA trade rumors: 76ers could be interested in Lakers guard Kentavious Caldwell-Popecenter_img Caldwell-Pope, 25, has veto power on any trade and “he and his agent, Rich Paul, would only sign off on a trade should a deal arise that benefit Caldwell-Pope’s career,” per the report. He has drawn interest from several teams in recent months, including the 76ers.Story on @TheAthleticNBA: Rockets emerge as possible suitor for Lakers’ Kentavious Caldwell-Pope in multi-team scenarios. https://t.co/jXEfj9viNJ— Shams Charania (@ShamsCharania) December 12, 2018Caldwell-Pope, who is averaging  8.6 points and 2.3 rebounds in 21.6 minutes per game with the Lakers this season, signed a new one-year, $12 million deal with the Lakers this offseason after he played for the team in 2017-18. He is not eligible to be traded until Dec. 15.  Related Newslast_img read more

Can smart cities protect their IoT Achilles heel from hackers?

first_imgLast year’s headline-grabbing security breaches of Internet of Things (IoT) technology was the opening salvo in a new cyberwar where smart cities are firmly in the crosshairs.Smart city security vulnerabilities were a recent topic of discussion with Paul Williams, SADC Country Manager with cyber security software firm Fortinet.Williams says that 2016’s high profile IoT cyber-attacks exposed how vulnerable this new technology is to hackers.“As was seen recently in a series of IoT-based denial of service attacks, IoT devices can be compromised and hijacked into a Shadownet and controlled by a command and control center run by hackers,” he says. “Alternatively, these devices and services may be attacked in order to deny services to legitimate users.”And considering that global smart city strategies hinge on connecting massive numbers of IoT devices and sensors, this boosts the attack surfaces targeted by smart city hackers.“The increase in the size of a smart city’s IoT device footprint corresponds to an increase in the size of its attack surface,” he warns.In light of how quickly IoT technology is being integrated into vital systems of smart cities, considerable damage can be done by malicious hackers.Some examples of possible smart city attacks could include: disrupting traffic by hijacking traffic lights or misdirecting vehicles; causing sewage system floods or disrupted access to drinking water; or remotely operating alarm systems and temperature control systems.But rather than hitting the panic button, Williams recommends smart cities begin a systematic approach to tackling their IoT security threats.“While it’s not possible to secure every possible security breach in a totally connected environment… it’s possible to take some key initial steps to strengthen the smart city’s security posture and architecture,” he says.Using strong encryptionAmong these initial steps would be the usual advice of using strong encryption, designing tamper-resistant systems and implementing strong system access control.Beyond these steps he says that complex smart city networks need to implement segmentation to boost security. He suggests, for example, that smart transportation networks be logically segmented from other networks like user services or energy networks.“This aids in isolating an attacks, and allows for the advanced detection of data and threats as attacks and malware move from one network zone to the other,” says Williams. “This also divides the smart city network into security zones, which aids in compliance, monitoring internal traffic and devices, and preventing unauthorized access to restricted data and resources.”He also recommends that smart cities develop specific mitigation strategies to counter distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. These strategies could include overprovisioning the city’s bandwidth to withstand the overwhelming nature of DDoS attacks.“This may be comprised of either an over provisioned appliance solution, or a hybrid solution consisting of appliances combined with a cloud based scrubbing center,” he says. Tags:#cybersecurity#Fortinet#IoT#Smart Cities#smart city Donal Power How Connected Communities Can Bolster Your Busi… For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In…center_img Related Posts How IoT Will Play an Important Role in Traffic … Surveillance at the Heart of Smart Citieslast_img read more

Your Investment In Reading Blog Posts

first_img“That blog post was too long.”“That newsletter was way too long.”“I’d read your stuff if you could just give me the summary.”Some blog posts are long. Some blog posts are short. But the length of the post is no representation of its value or the investment you should make in reading it. Your investment in reading a blog post (or newsletter) isn’t just the time is takes you to read it. Your investment in reading is far more significant.Your investment in really digesting something you read is the time it takes to read it + the time is takes to answer the questions that the author asks and answers + the time it takes to explore the answers to the questions that you come up with as you read + the time it takes to figure out how to apply any part of the idea that you find useful.You aren’t reading just to check the box “I read Seth’s blog,” or “I read Chris’s blog,” or “I read Dave’s blog.” Deriving value from reading is a more significant commitment of time and an even greater commitment of energy.If it isn’t the right time for you to make the full investment in exploring an idea, then don’t worry about it. The ideas that live on the web will still be here when you need them. If you don’t have time to read something, bookmark it and save it for later. I save important posts to Evernote and tag them so I can retrieve and study them later.If you’re going to take the time to read, invest the rest of the time you need to apply what you have read and learned. If something isn’t useful for you right now, discard it and invest your time on ideas that will benefit you.QuestionsWhy do you read blog posts and newsletters?What do you hope to get out of the time and energy you invest?What was the last idea that you read and took action on after having read it?What are you going to do with the next great idea you read instead of glossing over it and moving on?last_img read more

More Workers Getting Certification

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Quebecors Peladeau guilty plea could bar company from bidding on public contracts

first_imgMONTREAL – Quebec media mogul Pierre Karl Peladeau says he will challenge a court ruling nearly one month after he pleaded guilty to breaking provincial electoral law, posting on Facebook Monday that he had ignored the consequences for Quebecor Inc.The Quebecor CEO and former Parti Quebecois leader pleaded guilty July 10 to a violation of the Election Act after he personally reimbursed a $137,000 debt racked up by his campaign during the sovereigntist party’s leadership race in 2015. The legislation requires campaign debts to be repaid mainly through public donations.In a message posted to his Facebook page Monday night, Peladeau said his guilty plea could jeopardize Quebecor’s ability to do business with the province due to anti-corruption rules that bar companies with executives convicted under the act from bidding on public contracts.“It has become essential to see things through a perspective of fairness, as much for Quebecor as for its thousands of employees and its clients and partners who were, and still are, completely outside of my choice to get involved in active politics, of my family situation that forced my departure and of my personally reimbursing my campaign debt,” Peladeau wrote.Noting he had voted for the legislation to combat collusion and corruption, the businessman insisted he had “obviously never committed any acts” that would fall under that label.“I never engaged in fraudulent electoral practices, practices for which this law was established. Quite the contrary. I was transparent and I paid my debts. However, the future of thousands of dollars in contractual commitments, ranging from telecom services contracts to production and broadcasting programs…could become uncertain in the future,” he said in the nearly 1,000-word Facebook post.“The Quebec Treasury Board and its president…as well as the premier have the power to declare an exception to the automatic and unqualified application of the Act,” Peladeau added.Quebecor stated Tuesday that public contracts make up “a very small proportion” of its revenue and have “no material impact on the corporation’s profitability.”“We are confident that the matter will be settled in the near future without restricting the corporation’s activities or its public sector clients,” the Montreal-based company said in a release.Celebrity businessman Kevin O’Leary ran up a $529,000 debt during his 2015 Conservative leadership bid, according to Elections Canada, whose rules prevent candidates from pouring more than $25,000 into their own campaign.Elections Canada rejected a petition from the former “Dragons’ Den” star to let him pay off the debt personally.Companies in this story: (TSX:QBR.B)last_img read more

Indie Crossword Puzzlers Are Shaking Up A Very Square World

The New York Times3.5 The Washington Post3.9 BuzzFeed3.7 Wall Street Journal3.4 Newsday3.9 CrosSynergy3.3 The Times’ puzzle, though, isn’t the most highly rated on the Web. Indies may be ragtag, but their quality can be remarkably high. The popular blog Diary of a Crossword Fiend lets readers rate a selection of puzzles each day, from one to five stars. Indies do well, with indie icon Matt Gaffney’s topping the list and American Values Club and Quigley’s puzzles averaging above the Times so far this year. (Note, of course, that these ratings are subjective, and come from a highly selected sample of the universe of crossword solvers, namely those who rate crosswords on a crossword blog.)But that the indies are well-received doesn’t make them well-compensated. They’re wrestling with the same confusion about sustainable business models as all the other media upstarts.The New York Times has it relatively easy, with nearly 200,000 digital crossword subscribers, good for over $2 million in revenue in the first quarter of 2016, according to a company press release. When you figure in the hardcopy subscriptions and newsstand purchases due to the puzzle, plus the countless book collections, the Times crossword puzzle is almost certainly worth well north of $10 million a year. (The Times wouldn’t comment beyond what was disclosed in the press release.) Little of that money goes to the constructors: At its rate of $300 for a daily puzzle and $1,000 for a Sunday, I estimate that a little less than $150,000 a year is paid to the crossword constructors themselves.Outside the Times, though, monetization approaches vary wildly. The American Values Club crossword, the indie edited by Tausig, is subscription based. A year’s worth of puzzles is $20, or you can get a single puzzle for a buck, and proceeds are divvied up among constructors quarterly. Depending on the quarter, this model can yield more than the Times’ $300-per-puzzle rate, according to Tausig. “I’ve been a constructor for a long time, and also because I’m a hardcore Marxist, I want to put my money where my mouth is,” he said. Constructors there also retain some future rights to their puzzles. Tausig didn’t give me a precise count of his subscribers, but said there were no fewer than 3,000.Quigley, who runs an eponymous site, was inspired by Radiohead’s 2007 release of “In Rainbows” when he created his pay-what-you-want model. He publishes free puzzles on Mondays and Thursdays, and provides a “tip your constructor” PayPal link on his homepage. Between direct payments and the advertisement it provides for other paying puzzle gigs, Quigley estimated that his site is responsible for two-thirds of his income. He claimed an average of 12,000 people solve a typical puzzle on his site.And Matt Gaffney — whom other indie constructors described to me as the “juggernaut” and the “silverback gorilla” of the field and who tops the ratings list — oversees a mini-factory that publishes eight puzzles a week. About a year ago, Gaffney switched to a subscription-only model for his daily puzzle ($24 a year) which, he told me, has 500 to 600 subscribers. “It seems to be kind of the wave of the future,” he said. “But I think big media, regular media and indie puzzles will always coexist and coevolve for the foreseeable future. I don’t see one putting the other out of business.” Despite that, indies “are where all the crazy, new, fun stuff is happening.”In many ways, the crossword tumult mirrors that of the broader media world, pockmarked with hirings, firings, launches, closings and scandal. BuzzFeed hit the brakes, and USA Today ousted its crossword editor in May. But others hit the gas. The Wall Street Journal added a daily puzzle last September, and The Washington Post tapped a new crossword constructor in November. And Slate, stalwart of internet media, will feature the American Values Club crossword in its paid section, Slate Plus, starting in September.Madison, the former BuzzFeed editor, who has interned for both Shortz and Tausig, is heading back to the indie world himself. According to Madison, the BuzzFeed puzzle’s average 40,000 to 50,000 views didn’t justify its cost at the virally oriented site. (I emailed BuzzFeed for comment but have not yet received one.) He recently announced a new crossword project called Solve the Internet. Details were sketchy, but the description he gave me was heavy on “internet” and “social.” Madison wouldn’t offer a specific launch date but said to expect it soon.“I don’t understand what he’s talking about, but that’s a fantastic thing,” Quigley, 42, said of Madison’s puzzle ideas. “If we don’t go out and try to bring in that younger generation, we’ve got the buggy whip, and we’re gonna get blown out by something else.” Fireball3.9 Jonesin’ Crosswords3.3 Crossword Nation3.9 Brendan Emmett Quigley3.7 Los Angeles Times3.6 Matt Gaffney4.0 American Values Club3.6 Most highly rated crosswords Gawker wasn’t the only irreverent, iconoclastic internet media property to say farewell recently. To a much quieter dirge, the BuzzFeed crossword puzzle published its final edition this month. Its editor, 23-year-old puzzle wunderkind Caleb Madison, for whom this was his first job, left the company to strike out on his own.The BuzzFeed crossword, which launched in October, promised a millennial upheaval to the musty crossword genre: an internet-native, slang-fluent, pop-culture-obsessed puzzle aimed at young solvers. There was hope, given BuzzFeed’s large amounts of traffic, that it would serve as a meaningful competitor to the starchy, hegemonic New York Times crossword. “BuzzFeed Is Revolutionizing the Crossword Puzzle,” an Observer headline declared last year.It didn’t. Yet while BuzzFeed’s puzzle revolution fizzled, a devoted band of ragtag agitators remains devoted to the cause. A vibrant ecosystem of independent crosswords — “indies” — exists on the internet, its component puzzles multiplying and evolving, finding their niche and trying to find ways to survive. And some of them can outrate the gold standard over at the Times.“I think of the indie world like we’re all craft beer brewers,” Brendan Emmett Quigley, a professional puzzle constructor, told me. The Times is a Budweiser lager; the indies are small-batch saisons and IPAs.“My favorite thing about indie puzzles is the timeliness,” Neville Fogarty, an avid indie solver who helped found the Indie 500 crossword tournament, told me. Indie puzzles don’t have to wait months in a publication queue, as they would at the Times. They also aren’t subject to the stylistic constraints of a large media institution. Topics and themes, however recent, modern, niche or profane, are fair game. Nor are they subject to the physical constraints of a major newspaper. With few exceptions, all daily Times puzzles use 15-by-15 grids with rotational symmetry, a convention indies can and do break.Over (craft) beers recently, Ben Tausig,1It was Tausig whose tweet, about a suspiciously duplicated puzzle, eventually led to the FiveThirtyEight investigation into accusations of plagiarism against the crossword editor Timothy Parker. the editor of the acclaimed indie American Values Club crossword, reflected on the early days of indies, over a decade ago. “We were all out in the woods,” he said. “Papers were dying, papers were dropping their crosswords.” And so some crossword designers decided to go it alone. A risky proposition, but one that came with aesthetic upside. These sylvan constructors could rewrite the stylebook. “Crosswords were staid, you know? As much as I enjoyed them, there was always this feeling that the voice of the Times was not my generational voice. It was like, what if you made a crossword about rap, or something? That felt really radical at the time.”Criticism of the Times puzzle seems to have expanded of late, beyond the stylistic and into the political. It’s not just that the Times puzzle is staid, or geared toward olds. It’s been accused of tone deafness on issues of race and gender. A recent clue for the answer HAREM was “Decidedly nonfeminist women’s group,” and the clue “Exasperated comment from a feminist” led to the answer MEN. “Gangsta rap characters” were THUGS.But Will Shortz, the Times puzzle editor since 1993, is an icon for a reason. All the constructors I spoke to praised him for elevating the Times puzzle to its current station. “The Times’ job is arguably much harder, because they have to walk that thin line of making sure everyone is included,” Quigley said. It’s come a long way, too. The Times published its first crossword in 1942. If you scrape off a thick layer of dust, you’ll find a puzzle riddled with obscurities (the poets CRABBE and TASSO, the seaport HAGI, the Dutch town EDE) and ditchwater-dull clues (both IAN and YVON are clued as “Man’s name”). And even if some indie puzzlers would like to foment a revolution, it already took one to get the Times to the solid position it’s in today. Shortz oversaw a transition away from the dryest trivia to a puzzle that does include some popular culture. He has said that anything the paper covers should be fair game for the crossword.“The Times’ crossword audience is broad, from teens up to as old as people get,” Shortz told me in an email. “But the average [age] is higher than that for the indies. So in terms of overall tone and cultural references, the Times puzzle will skew a little older than the indies.” Shortz also mentioned the need for the Times puzzle to have a longer shelf life than the indies, which means it eschews some timelier subjects. The puzzle appears in syndication six weeks after its original publication, and sometimes in books years later. Boston Globe3.1 Chronicle of Higher Education3.3 Includes puzzles appearing at least ten times. Ratings are out of 5.Source: Diary of a Crossword Fiend PUZZLEAVG. USER RATING read more

Jupp Heynckes named German coach of the year

first_imgBayern Munich’s recently retired coach Jupp Heynckes has been voted the best manager in GermanyThe 73-year-old replaced the fired Carlo Ancelotti on an interim basis in October last year following a disastrous start to their campaign and his arrival was largely credited for their success with Bayern going on to secure a sixth successive Bundesliga crown and finishing 21 points ahead of their nearest rivals.Heynckes was named as the German coach of the year last weekend after his 91 votes edged out the 89 votes that Schalke’s young manager Dominico Tedesco had won.New Bayern boss Niko Kovac came third with 77 votes following an impressive campaign with Eintracht Frankfurt.Jadon SanchoMerson believes Arsenal should sign Sancho Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund winger Jadon Sancho might be the perfect player to play for the Gunners, according to former England international Paul Merson.“It’s particularly nice to see an older coach win the vote in times marked by a certain obsession with youth,” said Bayern president Uli Hoeneß on the club website.“Jupp Heynckes has absolutely earned this award because it is so unusual for a man to be introduced to such a tricky situation, completely turn it around from day one and see it through to the end.”Heynckes has now won the award four times throughout his managerial career following previous triumphs in 1981, 1986 and 2013.last_img read more

Chelsea set to offer Willian a new lucrative twoyear deal

first_imgChelsea winger Willian is set to be offered a new two-year contract shortly in order to fend off interest from Manchester UnitedThe Brazil international had been linked with a move away from Stamford Bridge this summer to both United and Barcelona.Although, while the Catalan side had made three attempts to sign Willian, no such bid arrived from United.But Chelsea are not prepared to risk losing Willian again with the Daily Mirror reporting that the Blues are now willing to break their club policy by offering him a new two-year deal.Chelsea only offer players at 30 years old or over a one-year extension.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedSolskjaer praises Harry Maguire after Man United’s 1-0 win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Ole Gunnar Solskjaer singled out Harry Maguire for praise after helping Manchester United keep a clean sheet in their 1-0 win over Leicester City.But Willian, who celebrated his 30th birthday last week, is an exception.The Brazilian recently admitted that he would have moved on from Stamford Bridge had Antonio Conte remained as manager.Although Maurizio Sarri’s arrival as the new Chelsea boss has pleased Willian and he has decided to remain at West London.Willian current earns £120,000-a-week and has just under two years remaining on his current contract.last_img read more

Rep Ellison Denies Abuse Allegations from Exgirlfriend

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