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Lindenhurst Dentist was Drunk During Procedure, Cops Say

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Robert Garelick was allegedly under the influence of alcohol when he performed dentistry on a patient Monday.And you were afraid of dentists before this story.Suffolk County police Monday arrested a Lindenhurst dentist for allegedly conducting a dental procedure while he was under the influence of alcohol.The dentist, 57-year-old Robert Garelick, was arrested around 4:30 p.m. Monday after police received a complaint that he was allegedly drunk on the job. When First Precinct officers arrived they determined that Garelick was under the influence of alcohol while performing dental work on a patient, police said in a news release.Police didn’t say what prompted the call but noted that there was concern about the dentist’s physical condition.Investigators declined to elaborate on specifics regarding the case.Garelick, a Melville resident who is licensed to practice dentistry by New York State, was charged with reckless endangerment. He is scheduled to be arraigned at First District Court in Central Islip on Tuesday.last_img read more

New Orleans shows its spirit

first_img A threat of thunderstorms Saturday prompted a one-day delay of the Krewe of Endymion’s parade, which was set to follow the Krewe of Bacchus through the Uptown neighborhood on Sunday night. Three smaller parades were held in the afternoon. The sunny weather and party atmosphere provided a sense of optimism for New Orleans six months after Katrina flooded 80 percent of the city and dispersed more than two-thirds of the population. “I just hope the rest of the world doesn’t think New Orleans is OK because we’re having Mardi Gras,” said Cynthia Perkins, who lost her home in the flood. While some decried the city’s plan to hold Mardi Gras celebrations while tens of thousands of residents were displaced, Ebony Jenkins, who lost home, car and possessions in the flood, was in a festive mood nonetheless. “My take on it is: Let it roll,” she said as she waited for floats and masked riders to fill the street and shed a rain of doubloons and beads on the throngs. – Associated Press 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant While some revelers noted crowds so deep that people could barely move, they were thinner than in years past. Velasquez said her business was down by at least half. “What can you expect, it’s Katrina!” she said. Pat Kaschalk, a teacher in New Orleans, estimated the crowds at three-quarters of the usual numbers. “It was actually possible to catch something this year,” she said. “We were able to get close to the floats and make eye contact with the riders. Normally we wouldn’t be able to do that.” New Orleans children sat atop ladders yelling for beads and other trinkets Sunday as two of the Carnival season’s biggest and glitziest parades rolled through this fun-starved city. By nightfall, the warm, sunny weather had chilled a bit, but that didn’t stop the crowds – old, young and of all races – from partying. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, which flooded most of the city last summer, people seemed a bit nicer – and less apt to lace their words with profanities – than in previous years, an annual vendor said. “Before, the people were more aggressive; now I see there is more passion, more calm,” said Miryan Velasquez, 60, who sells alligator on hot dog buns, lemonade and shrimp po-boys, a quintessential New Orleans sandwich on French bread. last_img read more